Flashback Friday: The Scoop on Ice Cream Through the Ages

July 12, 2013

Credit: bryant3.bryant.edu
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As the Summer heats up, we all need something to help us chill and there is nothing better than some delicious cold ice cream. Volume 2 of The Old Farmer’s Almanac for Kids gives us a timeline history lesson on ice cream through the ages.

A.D. 56-68: Roman emperor Nero is believed to have sent slaves into the mountains to fetch snow to mix with fruit and honey.

1744: For the first time on record, American colonists dine on strawberries and ice cream in Annapolis, Maryland.

1782-1817: American presidents Washington, Jefferson, and Madison treat guests to ice cream at inaugurals and special dinners.

1860: Most towns have an ice cream parlor or saloon. Vanilla is the most popular flavor.

1870s: Ice cream makers offer many flavors, including chocolate, tutti-frutti, rice, cinnamon - even asparagus.

1878: The first mechanical ice cream scoop is patented.

1880s: The ice cream sundae, probably named for the day of the week and costing five cents, becomes popular.

1890: A concoction made with sweetened milk, carbonated water, and a raw egg, called a milk shake, becomes popular with men.

1899: Hokeypokey vendors in New York City start selling ice cream sandwiches for two or three cents.

1904: Ernest A. Hamwi makes and serves the first ice cream cone, at the St. Louis World’s Fair.

1920: Harry B. Burt of Youngstown, Ohio, makes the first ice cream on a stick. Christian Nelson in Onawa, Iowa, invents the chocolate-dipped Temptation I-Scream Bar. His advertising slogan becomes, “I scream, you scream, we all scream for the I-Scream Bar.”


Ginger Vaughan has worked for The Old Farmer's Almanac for over a decade. Like the Almanac she strives to be "useful, with a pleasant degree of humor." 

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