Fermented Bread and Butter Pickles

Fermented Bread and Butter Pickles
Celeste Longacre

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I love bread and butter pickles. But the general kind of pickle, made with vinegar, lacks the digestive enzymes and probiotics of the fermented ones.

Here is a recipe for how to make these delicious and helpful pickles.

You will need:

3 medium cucumbers

½ cup thinly sliced onion

1 grape leaf

½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

3 tablespoons home made whey

1 tablespoon sea salt or Himalayan pink

½ cup honey or maple syrup

1 heaping tablespoon whole celery seeds

1 tablespoon yellow or brown mustard seeds

1 teaspoon turmeric

½ cup quality water

1 wide mouth quart mason jar

1 Ziploc freezer pint


Recipe direction:

Wash cucumbers and grape leaf and place the grape leaf along the inside of the canning jar. The presence of this leaf helps the cucumbers to stay crisp.

 

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Slice onions into small half-circles and cut cucumbers into thin slices.

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Place a few cucumbers in the bottom of the jar, followed by some onion bits. Repeat until the jar is almost full leaving about 2 inches of head space—or air—at the top.

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In a small bowl, mix all the other ingredients. Pour over the cucumbers until 1/3 is missing. If the liquid level in the jar isn’t quite 1/3, add more water until it is. Repeat the process twice more until there is about 1 ½ inches of head space at the top. The cucumbers should be about ½ inch below the top of the liquid. Put a small amount of water in the Ziploc bag. Place this on top of the cucumbers to keep them submerged under the juice.

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Screw the cap on tightly and leave it on the counter for 2 or 3 days to ferment before storing it in the refrigerator.

Have you ever fermented?  You may also enjoy learning how to make fruit kvass, nature’s soda!

Let me know if you have any questions.

About This Blog

Celeste Longacre has been growing virtually all of her family’s vegetables for the entire year for over 30 years. She cans, she freezes, she dries, she ferments & she root cellars. She also has chickens. Celeste has also enjoyed a longtime relationship with The Old Farmer’s Almanac as their astrologer and gardens by the Moon. Her new book, “Celeste’s Garden Delights,” is now available! Celeste Longacre does a lot of teaching out of her home and garden in the summer. Visit her web site at www.celestelongacre.com for details.

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Homemade Whey?

How do you make whey?

making whey

You need to have access to raw milk to make whey. Put it in a jar and leave it on the counter until it begins to separate. This can take two days or seven; it depends upon the temperature in the room and a few other things. Once it has separated, pour it through a strainer lined with cheesecloth above a bowl. The curds will stay in the cheesecloth and the whey will fall into the bowl.

Substitutions?

I am allergic to cucumbers so I am.wondering if I could use small zucchini instead?

zucchini

I don’t see why you couldn’t use zucchini instead. Let us know how it goes!

Can I make these without the

Can I make these without the grape leaf?

grape leaf

Yes, you can make them without the grape leaf. The cucumbers may get soft after a while. Some say that a horseradish leaf also helps to keep the cucumbers crunchy.

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