New Year's Resolutions for Gardeners

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A new year is upon us. It may not be as exciting as the first tomato ripening or the first lilac flower opening, but it’s a time for looking ahead and making new plans. 

The garden has disappeared under a thin coverlet of white which thankfully hides all the chores left undone. This temporary lull in activity is a welcome holiday from work and gives an excuse for dreaming. For now we have time to take stock of the past with an eye toward creating an even brighter future.

8 Gardening Resolutions

I hate to add to your list of resolutions but have you considered:

  1. Taking more pictures to record your garden’s progress over the growing season? Even the view out the kitchen window changes greatly as the year marches on. Snap a picture of your garden from the same vantage point on the first day of each month and at the end of the year you’ll have a great photo essay of the rise and fall of a year in your garden.
  2. Trying your hand at building a trellis, arbor, or pergola? Even if you are not handy with tools, now is the time to try a new craft. The rustic look is in, so your project doesn’t have to be perfect to do the job and it will give you an excuse to buy that new climbing rose or another clematis.
  3. Building a compost bin? Composting is the gardener’s way of recycling old plant material into rich, soil-nourishing compost. Plants love it! Wooden pallets are often free to source and are the perfect size for making a large compost bin. See how to build a compost bin with these steps.
  4. Keeping a garden journal?  It’s useful and enjoyable to track everything you do in the garden from planting to harvest. This year, the Almanac’s Garden Planner will be launching a ground-breaking new garden journal for your phone so it’s easy to take photos as well as track everything you do, from planting to harvesting and photos to weather forecasts. It’s free with the online Garden Planner.
  5. Getting the shed or garage organized? Hang larger hand tools on hooks and nails so they’re easy to grab. Put pruners and trowels in a clay pot.
  6. Growing and cooking a new vegetable?  If you like carrots, try parsnips which cook up nutty and spicy. How about planting leeks, a milder relative of onions? One of the most under-appreciated vegetables is rutabaga, which roasts up as sweet and rich as butternut squash with a touch of pepper.
  7. Trying more organics?  Switch to organic fertilizers for your lawn. Learn about natural pest control for healthier plants in your garden.
  8. Trying a new growing method?  How about planning a square-foot-garden or a raised bed garden?  Perhaps this year, try growing tomatoes in pots?

Gardening Lessons

Gardening teaches us important lessons: a reverence for life, responsibility, nurturing, achievement, self-esteem, and hard work. These are values worth sharing. The act of gardening has a positive effect on young and old alike and promotes a sense of community. We also feel better about ourselves when we can help someone less fortunate.

  1. Gardening can become more than a pleasant hobby if you share the experience with others. Many communities have ongoing beautification projects that welcome new volunteers and new ideas.
  2. If you are overburdened with produce each summer, your local food pantry or soup kitchen can make good use of your excess.
  3. An elderly neighbor would love an hour or two of yard help each week.
  4. Even the delivery of an occasional bouquet of flowers from your garden can help brighten someone’s day.

The list is endless.

Winter is nature’s dormant time; it gives us a chance to slow down and renew our bonds with the natural world—take a walk, watch the birds, gaze at the stars on a clear, cold evening.

Look to the future. No matter how long you have been gardening, there is always more to learn and something new to try.

Happy New Year!

 

About This Blog

Get inspired by Robin Sweetser's backyard gardening tips. Robin has been a contributor to The Old Farmer's Almanac and the All-Seasons Garden Guide for many years. She and her partner Tom have a small greenhouse business and also sell plants, cut flowers, and vegetables at their local Farmer's Market.

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