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Uses for Peanut Butter You've Probably Never Tried*

May 16, 2011

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From shaving cream and leather polish to mousetrap bait, peanut butter gets the job done

*If you or a family member suffers from peanut allergy, please skip this post.

According to the National Peanut Board, Dr. George Washington Carver developed more than 300 products from the humble peanut. They include face powder, shampoo, paper, shaving cream, hand lotion, insecticides, glue, charcoal, rubber, nitroglycerin, plastics, and axle grease.

Today’s peanut butter, a staple in most pantries, can serve an astonishing variety of household purposes. Try these:

  • Use a bit of peanut butter on a cotton cloth to rub off label adhesives.
  • Massage a bit of peanut butter into hair to remove a wad of chewing gum.
  • Use a thin coat as a substitute for shaving cream. (Really! Hydrates and moisturizes.)
  • Polish leather and vinyl items using a bit of peanut butter on a cotton cloth. Buffs up wooden items, too.
  • Hang pine cones stuffed with a mixture of peanut butter and coarse cornmeal as a treat for winter birds.
  • Smear it on garden tools (including wooden handles) as a winter preservative and on lawn-mower blades as a lubricant.
  • Spread some on a slice of apple or a scrap of bread for a good mousetrap bait.
  • Encourage your dog to swallow a pill by sticking it into the center of a little gob of peanut butter.

Note: Smooth peanut butter works best for these uses.

Tasty, nutritious, and packed with antioxidants, peanuts-only peanut butter can also serve as a healthy butter alternative. If you like the taste, simply substitute smooth peanut butter for the butter In recipes for baked goods calling for butter.

Learn more with these fun facts about peanuts.
 

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Margaret Boyles lives in a wood-heated house in central New Hampshire. She grows vegetables, eats weeds, keeps chickens, swims in a backyard pond in summer, snowshoes in the surrounding woods in winter, and commutes by bike whenever possible.

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Comments

Sounds reasonable...

By Margaret Boyles

Thanks for the tip! I'll try it immediately, Bobby Jo.
 
I imagine the peanut butter fills in the scratches, as I've used it for that purpose on wooden items many times.

another use for peanut butter,,,

By bobbyjowebb

rub peanut butter on a damaged cd or dvd, then wipe off with a clean cloth or paper towel to remove scratches.

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