The 2010 All-Seasons Garden Guide Press Release

The Old Farmer's Almanac All-Seasons Garden Guide: New edition offers a bounty of tried-and-true tips

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Gardeners told the editors what they wanted to know, and here it is: The Old Farmer’s Almanac 2010 All-Seasons Garden Guide, created by gardeners for gardeners, is filled with grounded and guaranteed techniques, tips, and tricks. Pocket-size and a perfect reference tool for the practical gardener, The 2010 All-Seasons Garden Guide is available now for an affordable-on-any-budget $3.99 wherever books and magazines are sold.

The varied contents of this year’s edition developed out of a survey of readers and gardeners hosted by Almanac.com. It is no surprise to Garden Guide editor Janice Stillman that, overwhelmingly, the most enthusiastic responses were to traditional topics such as bringing butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden, growing edibles—fruits and vegetables—productively, and making the most of a small space.

“Gardeners want to be successful—they want their efforts to be worthwhile. We survey readers often and prioritize their interests. Through this and other channels, we learned that our readers—like most gardeners, whether new or long at it—are looking for sensible and sustainable ideas and solutions,” says Stillman, who is also an avid gardener.

“Our goal is to inspire and guide gardeners with plot plans, fresh ideas, and truly useful ‘how-to’ advice. When we’ve covered everything they tell us they want, we add a surprise or two.”

Here’s a sample of what’s inside The 2010 All-Seasons Garden Guide:

• Grow a no-muss, no-fuss (well, almost) garden. No time? Small space? No worries! The Garden Guide shows readers how to create an effective and efficient garden in one weekend (or less).

• Learn 25 tips that could save your season. Simple solutions to common challenges: nontoxic ways to repel common pests, a simple solution to sweeten lettuce, how to plug a hose hole, and much more!

• Plant and grow the best-tasting tomatoes. Experts from around the country—seedsmen, county fair winners, extension service folks, and more—champion their favorites and share their secrets for a bountiful harvest.

• Can, freeze, or store fresh fruits and vegetables. Once you grow it, how do you stow it? Here are recipes and advice for preserving a homegrown or farmer’s market harvest that can be enjoyed all winter long.

• Invite hummingbirds and butterflies to stay—from planting the right kind of flowers (shape and size matter!) to offering a buffet of treats, from select table scraps to sweets to sweat.

• Cultivate fig trees in containers. Use old whiskey barrels to grow beautiful and deliciously sweet figs—almost anywhere.

• Harvest the most flavorful vegetables for cooking. Here are the best varieties of beans, eggplant, carrots, cabbage, leeks, summer squash, and more for containers or ground, with growing tips, herb companions, and recipe suggestions.

Although The All-Seasons Garden Guide—like its parent publication, The Old Farmer’s Almanac—is published annually, its newly relaunched Web site, Almanac.com/Garden, offers tips, advice, and green inspiration every day. Almanac.com/Garden also hosts a community forum where gardeners and home owners can ask questions and share advice and ideas.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac All-Seasons Garden Guide digs into the subjects that matter most to anyone who loves—or wants—to grow vegetables, fruit, or flowers. This annual reference guide is one in the family of publications produced by Yankee Publishing Inc. of Dublin, New Hampshire. It is available at plant nurseries, home centers, and wherever books and magazines are sold.

The All-Seasons Garden Guide is also available bundled with The Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Journal for $13.95. This “all-in-one” gardening package is sold exclusively at Almanac.com/store or by calling 800-256-2622 (800-ALMANAC).

The Old Farmer’s Almanac line of products includes several themed calendars; cookbooks, including the Everyday Cookbook and a series based on winning recipes from county fairs and cook-offs; and the best-selling Old Farmer’s Almanac for Kids—now in its third volume and available at Almanac.com/Store!

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EDITOR'S NOTE: For additional information, to schedule an interview with an editor of The Old Farmer's Almanac All-Seasons Garden Guide, or to obtain a complimentary media review copy, please contact at 206-842-8922 or e-mail Almanac Media Relations.

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