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Bird Sounds: American Goldfinch

Credit: Ohio Department of Natural Resources

Listen to the bird sounds of the American Goldfinch.

Click play button.

Compliments of The Macaulay Library at The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

See what species have been spotted in your area on the interactive maps at Ebird.com.

Have you heard an American Goldfinch? Add your comments below. Be sure to let us know where you live or where you've heard this bird sound before!

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Comments

When I was trying to play the

By Larry B Jacobs

When I was trying to play the bird sounds on my cell phone they would not play. thinking I had a problem with my phone I took it in to a tech. He told me they did not play because of the format you use. He said you need to have a MP3 format to play the sounds on a cell phone. I was wondering if your web techs could possibly change the format over so we can hear the sounds on our cell phones.

Thank you
Larry

My son found a fledgling that

By Dawn Thomson

My son found a fledgling that the neighbor dog was going to eat. I wasn't sure what to feed it & researched many baby bird "formulas" before developing my own. Our baby loves this recipe! First, make oatmeal powder by adding 1/2 c oats to the blender. Grind until you have a fine powder. Do this until you have made a few cups. Next, you will need to add 1 Tbsp Natural Unsweetened Applesauce, 6 raw egg yolks, 4 tsp water, and 2 tsp Hartz milk replacer for kittens in the blender on low. Mix well, adding one tsp of the oatmeal powder at a time to thicken the mixture(Approx. 16 tsp). Let stand for 5 min. It can be refrigerated & we warm it by putting a spoonful in a small cup, and then place the cup in a dish with very hot water & feed with an eyedropper. We usually play the finch song before feeding to stimulate the fledgling. It's VERY effective!

i also found a fledgling by

By sara ertel

i also found a fledgling by my house i didn't know what to feed it so i crushed up some worms but he bit me instead he died the next day.

I have a website about

By lorraine cupples

I have a website about finches and other birds and virtual pets along with videos of finches and a few seagulls. I live in florida so my realistic seagull calls made me add seagulls to the site. The website is www.finchland.webs.com

Anyone know of any ebooks

By Merle

Anyone know of any ebooks that combine the photos and the birds sounds.

We had two pairs of these

By KathleenBP

We had two pairs of these coming to our feeders this spring. We now have about 10 pairs (10 males and 10 females). It is amazing to watch them! They eat a lot. We fill up our feeders in the morning and then again in the evening. We have 6 feeders that hold about 2 cups of seed each and then one thistle feeder, that holds 3 cups, that we fill up about every other day. I live in northern Maine, 7 miles from the Canadian border, right in the center of the state.

We have dozens of these

By sharon99

We have dozens of these little beauties come after a nice rain shower and about a dozen or so stay around. We have feeders and suet and they seem to like them. I love seeing the little flashes of yellow light as they fly by. We live in northeastern Oklahoma

We have lots of these birds.

By Evelyn Hays

We have lots of these birds. They like thistle so I put up special feeders. They eat upside down so I put the perches that way. In winter their feathers are olive drab but change to bright yellow in spring. I live in Southeastern Kentucky.

There were several pair of

By woodnymph

There were several pair of these birds here in rural Dobson, North Carolina this season, they liked to attach themselves to the thistle soxs, and we learned that they are very aggressive. They would fly from the sox to the birdfeeders when a Northern Cardinal, or Mountain Blue bird would land on them. They would even chase others of their same species away from the feeders.

I have both males and females

By Mare-Anne Jarvela

I have both males and females coming to my garden this month. They love the seed heads of Black-eyed Susans, cone flowers and chicory. I usually hear them before I see them! I live in New Hampshire.

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