How to Make Dill Pickles

The Old-Fashioned Way

Credit: http://www.ars.usda.gov
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Learn how to make dill pickles the "old-fashioned" way. Pickling is a great way to store excess vegetables for the winter, or just to make a tasty snack for the summer!

This pickle recipe is great for pickling cucumbers as well as a variety of other vegetables. That's right—you can make pickles out of cucumbers, cauliflower, green and red peppers, onions, green tomatoes, summer squash, baby ears of corn—lots of different vegetables can be pickled!

  • Make a brine of 3/4 cup of pickling salt, 2 1/2 quarts of water, and 1/2 cup vinegar, heating to dissolve the salt and cooling before use. Alternate layers of vegetables—small (3-4 inches long) whole cucumbers or large pieces of other vegetables—with layers of fresh dill in a large crock or ceramic bowl. For an extra kick, add hot red peppers and peeled garlic cloves. 
  • Pour brine over vegetables, and weight down using a cloth, plate, and a canning jar full of water.
  • For 2 weeks, white scum will appear on the top of your pickles. Remove it daily. 
  • When the two weeks is up, pack vegetables in hot, sterile jars. Heat 1/2 cup pickling salt, 1 quart vinegar, and 4 quarts water to boiling, pour over vegetables, and seal. Process for 15 minutes in boiling water bath. 

Looking for an easier pickle recipe? See our recipe for Kosher-Style Dill Pickles.

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Comments

I really want to make this

By Tammy Agee on April 6

I really want to make this recipe but I don't understand the ending where it says process. Could someone explain please?

You process so it doesn't

By georgewilson on April 7

You process so it doesn't spoil. You just put the filled jars in boiling water with some tongs. Make sure your jars are filled up and the lids are sealed with the bands. Once the water returns to a boil, process the amount of time in the instructions. Then take the jars out with tongs and let them cool. Test the lids by pressing down on them; if they are solid, you're good.

Ok, so I tried this. I used a

By Tina Roeseler

Ok, so I tried this. I used a cookie jar instead. It may be porcelain instead of ceramic. (I'm not sure it just says made in china). I didn't use the cloth and plate with a jar on top to weight it down. I simply turned the lid (which has a bit of a dome on top) upside down. The cuc's have been in there for almost a week now and there is no scum developing. :( I followed the rest of the directions exactly. Do you think it's because of the jar or is it because I didn't use the cloth, plate, and jar of water on top? O..also it's just been at room temperature on the counter.

Pickles can be safely made in

By Almanac Staff

Pickles can be safely made in stoneware, glass, or food-grade plastic containers. Not knowing what your container is made of may be part of the problem.
Turning over the cookie jar lid may not have been heavy enough, which is why we suggest weighting it down.

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