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Plants that are Poisonous for Pets

Here are some of the more common plants that are poisonous to pets. Note: There are hundreds of plants that could be harmful. For more information, see the ASPCA poison center.

Cats

What they CAN'T eat:

  • Azalea (Rhododendron)
  • Common or cherry laurel
  • Carnations
  • Cyclamens
  • Day lily
  • Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia)
  • Elephant's ears (Caladium)
  • Forced indoor bulbs such as narcissus (Paper whites)
  • Holly
  • Hydrangeas
  • Mistletoe
  • Oleander
  • Philodendron
  • Rubber plants
  • True Ivy
  • Winter, or false Jerusalem, cherry

Dogs

What they CAN'T eat:

  • Elephant's Ear
  • Castor Bean
  • Chokecherry
  • Christmas Rose
  • Daffodil
  • English Ivy
  • Foxglove
  • Holly
  • Jimsonweed
  • Lantana (houseplant)
  • Morning Glory
  • Mums
  • Nightshade, also called Belladonna
  • Common garden potato (leaves, shoots, sprouts)
  • Rose of Sharon
  • Yew

Rabbits and Guinea Pigs

What they CAN eat:

  • Chickweed
  • Coltsfoot
  • Dandelion
  • Goldenrod
  • Green clover
  • Groundsel
  • Mallow
  • Plantain
  • Yarrow
  • Asters
  • Marigolds
  • Nasturtiums
  • Sunflowers
  • Sweet Peas

What they CAN'T eat:

  • Buttercups
  • Deadly nightshade
  • Scarlet Pimpernel
  • Flowers of leaves from bulbs, such as tulips
  • Lily of the valley
  • Rhododendrons

Iguanas

Iguanas love fruits and vegetables, but sometimes-pet iguanas don’t know the difference between poisonous and not poisonous, as wild iguanas instinctively do.

What they CAN'T eat:

  • Amaryllis bulbs
  • Apple seeds
  • Avocado pits, peels, foliage
  • Azaleas
  • Christmas Cacti
  • Cyclamens
  • Daffodil bulbs and sap
  • Delphiniums
  • Dieffenbachia (dumbcane)
  • Hyacinth Bulb
  • Hydrangea Flowers
  • Impatiens
  • Ivy (most kinds)
  • Mistletoe berries and foliage
  • Rhododendrons
  • Tomato plant foliage and vines
  • Tulips
  • Wisteria

There are many more plants listed on the ASCPA poison control center Web site.

If a pet ingests a toxic plant, call the veterinarian or the ASCPA poison control center immediately.

Take them to the vet to be on the safe side, bringing the plant with you.

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I live where there are lots

By Gail Callis

I live where there are lots of pine and cedar trees my dog like to chew on pinecones and small twigs that fall from the trees he does not swallow it he chews off pieces and spits it out. Is this a harmful habit?

Pine (Pinus spp.) is not

By Almanac Staff

Pine (Pinus spp.) is not listed on the ASPCA toxic plant list for dogs (see below) or on several other sites that focus on pet health, such as lists from some veterinary medicine schools. A few unofficial sites do say that household pine oil, or sap from certain pines might cause problems. As for cedar, it would depend on the genus; true cedar is Cedrus, but many other plants are called cedar, such as junipers (red cedar); there is not much evident that the common name of cedar appears on toxic plant lists for dogs, nor the common name of juniper (Juniperus). For best advice, though, we'd recommend that you talk to your veterinarian about whether these trees/shrubs are toxic to dogs.

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/dogs-plant-list

There is, of course, the possibility that your dog might inadvertently choke on the smaller pieces or smaller cones (nothing to do with toxin). In this light, especially if your dog is the enthusiastic type that does everything with gusto, it probably would be good to try to train him not to chew them.

Thank you for posting these

By Redheadedme

Thank you for posting these lists. I find them extremely helpful. Perhaps we should be noting that there are plants whose very presence can cause an allergic reaction. We purchased Poinsettias from a fundraiser and within a day of setting these two plants on the dining table, our dog developed hives all over her body. The vet innocently asked, "You don't have any poinsettia in the house do you?" They were gone the same day and her hives disappeared soon thereafter.

My indoor cat thinks wheat

By bJane collins

My indoor cat thinks wheat grass is the best treat ever; she doesn't want catnip or canned food for a treat but wheat grass is always welcome.

One thing I didn't see on any

By Mentha

One thing I didn't see on any of the lists is Sansievera aka mother in law's tongue. I had a rabbit that took a chomp out of one and died a day later. The sapoins (natural soap) caused frothing of the mouth.

Here's another category that

By K Kritter Korral

Here's another category that would be greatly appreciated to have a list like this ... Companion Parrots!

I thought rabbits couldn’t

By Anony Mous

I thought rabbits couldn’t eat lettuce?

According to the ASPCA, it's

By Almanac Staff

According to the ASPCA, it's best to avoid feeding your rabbit iceberg lettuce but the following greens are healthy foods you can feed rabbits: romaine and leaf lettuces, parsley, cilantro, collard greens and dandelion greens.

can rabbits eat a plant

By shakira

can rabbits eat a plant called belladonna o will they die

Belladonna is very toxic

By Almanac Staff

Belladonna is very toxic though, interestingly, rabbits eat the plant without severe harmful effects (from what we can see).


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