What Day Does Christmas Fall On? 2014

Batty sporting a Christmas bow.

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Need to know what day Christmas falls on for 2014 and 2015? The middle of the week? A weekend? See our chart—plus, Christmas facts and fun.

What is Christmas?

Christmas Day is a Christian holiday commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ. Although the actual date of Christ's birth is unknown, it has been celebrated on December 25 since the 4th century. Christmas is also extensively celebrated by non-Christians as a seasonal holiday, on which popular traditions such as gift-giving, feasting, and caroling take place.

Planning a Christmas feast? This holiday, try some of our main dishes, appetizers, sides, and desserts! See our recipes for Christmas Dinner.

We wish you a very merry Christmas!

Christmas Dates

Year Christmas
2014 Thursday, December 25
2015 Friday, December 25

 

Christmas History

Christmas Day is a Christian holiday commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ. Although the actual date of Christ's birth is unknown, it has been celebrated on December 25 since the 4th century. Christmas is also extensively celebrated by non-Christians as a seasonal holiday, on which popular traditions such as gift-giving, feasting, and caroling take place.

In ancient times, Celts divided the year into four sections marked by quarter days, the days of the two solstices and two equinoxes. The winter solstice, the shortest and darkest day of the year, was the fourth quarter day. It signaled a celebratory time, as the Sun began to reemerge and the land experienced a rebirth. Gradually, to conform more closely to the liturgical year of the Christian church, the fourth quarter day merged easily with the Christian celebration of the birth of Christ. As Christianity began to spread in the 4th century, the Christmas feast day was set on December 25 by Pope Julius I to align with the Roman pagan holiday Dies natalis solis invicti, "the birth of the invincible Sun."

Today's rich mosaic of Christmas customs dates back through the ages. Evergreen branches were used to symbolize life in ancient solstice festivals, as they stayed green in winter. This tradition was absorbed by Christians, who interpreted the evergreens as the Paradise tree and began decorating them with apples. The candles and lights associated with Christmas, meant to symbolize guiding beacons for the Christ child, may have evolved from the Yule log, which was lit to entice the Sun to return as part of the jol (Yule) festival in pagan Scandinavia.

Christmas Recipes and Background

Check out some of our favorite holiday dishes on our Christmas recipes page!

Make some easy kids' Christmas cookies with the family.

Then, learn how some Christmas firsts came about and have your Christmas questions answered!

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Comments

Merry Christmas and happy new

By tony s.

Merry Christmas and happy new year everyone!

I'm from Iran that the people

By mostafa

I'm from Iran that the people don't care to christmas.
but very few of them think about this.
I think becaus we are muslim.
But Christianity is God's Religion.
We have to respect.
But many people do not understand.
Merry Christmas to all

Merry Christmas to you, as

By Mike T

Merry Christmas to you, as well.

The resurection of Jesus

By End Even

The resurection of Jesus Christ, is the hope of the gospel to be taught through out the world. From life to life everlasting.

Thank you for your beautiful

By Annette Drolet

Thank you for your beautiful post. Yes, Jesus is the joy and hope of all our lives. Merry Christmas!

If we dont know the christ's

By derick jose

If we dont know the christ's birth date, why we we celebrate on December 25th?? Just because it will be a snow day??? Lol, everything is fake ... I dont know if ther is anything real.... I think, only christ can prove it or the real one and only God!!!

According to the Catholic

By Almanac Staff

According to the Catholic Church, Jesus may not have actually born on December 25 nor is this proclaimed. We celebrate it on this day.  It's a celebration of the Incarnation, not a memorial of a specific day. One reason December 25 may have been thought fitting is its proximity to the winter solstice. After that date the days start to become longer, and thus it is at the beginning of a season of light entering the world (cf. John 1:5).

I agree with you. I've read

By Ms JKL

I agree with you. I've read the Bible over and over and it never says Jesus said he wants us to remember his birth, but to remember his crusification on a stake. The reason why he died for us. He. requestwd for us to celebrate his death because he died for our sins. Being Adam was a perfect man who sinned and was deemed to die as all of his offspring. Until another perfect man equal to Adams came in our behalf to redeem our sins. The unselfish Only Begotten son of Our Creator, Jesus Christ.

The symbolism of the

By Almanac Staff

The symbolism of the Christmas candle varies. For example: It is taken as a symbol of Jesus, the Light of the World. It is also thought to symbolize the star over Bethlehem. In certain countries, such as Ireland and Spain, it was traditional to place candles in the window to guide the Holy Family to shelter.

In medieval Europe, a large candle, called the Christmas candle, was lit and was burned until Twelfth Night; this candle tradition is still used today in certain countries, such as France, Ireland, and Denmark.

Advent wreaths contain four candles, for the four weeks of Advent before Christmas day.

I've always heard of candles

By Katmandu2

I've always heard of candles symbolizing the comming of Jesus as the Light of the World. However, this mythology parallels many others that talk about the rebirth of the sun. I don't know where they got their info, but I guess that it could be said thata child has to be guided into tje world at birth.

I have never heard of

By rdeesw

I have never heard of Christmas candles ever serving as a beacon to guide the Christ-child but rather as a symbol for Christ's coming into the world even as a child. This is a significant theological distinction. Where did you get your information?

I thought the tradition, in

By Les Mitchell

I thought the tradition, in Ireland at least, of a candle in the window to guide the Holy Family was well known. During times of Catholic persecution, the candle also served as a sign to any passing priest that the home was a safe place to say mass. It's not really theology, just a tradition.

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