Hope you all....

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jhrgreer@yahoo.com's picture
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....have a wonderful Easter weekend.

Tomorrow starts a 10 day Spring break for the kids. Could not ask for nicer weather for it either. Up in the 80's here and loving it!

Redmink's picture
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Happy Easter To You

Thanks, and enjoy the weather, good for an Easter Egg Hunt!!

blacksheep's picture
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Happy Easter

to youse too!

Dijean's picture
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Happy Easter

Any big plans? Ours starts the 18th.It'll be in the 80's on wednesday! (my day off! : )

jhrgreer@yahoo.com's picture
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Nope....

No big plans here. The easter bunny brought garden kits and gloves to the kids so we plan on helping them each get their own garden spots going. Other than that trips to the allergist, dentist and eye dr.

We are going to be in the 30's at night by Thursday. BLAH! Will have to cover all my fruit trees.

You have any good plans?

sussexman's picture
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Kids in Gardens.

If I can give you a little advice folks, if you are going to get kids interested in gardening then you must give them the best ground you got. I gave my daughter her own patch and she dug it, weeded it and sowed her own seeds ( this was when she was about 4 yrs old) Also I used to get a piece of sticky tape and stick a seed of all the ones I used to sow so's she could see that different plants have different seeds.Today she has her own garden ( a window sill 8 floors up) but she can get seeds to grow that I never could (eg parsley) and other herbs.
Now my Dad gave me a bit of garden covered with weeds, brambles , the worse patch. I dug it cleared it and sowed my seed and came home from school one day to find he'd planted spud's in it. Said it too good for a kid to have and gave me another scrubby patch, I didn't do any gardening again for over 20 years.
As for late frosts, if you can get out before the sun gets on the plants you can wash the frost off, I've done it with tomatoes plants and dahlia flowers.
Sussexman
PLANS man proposes God disposes

jhrgreer@yahoo.com's picture
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Good advice Sussex. They

Good advice Sussex.

They have always helped with the big garden and always eat whatever we had them plant because "they did it". So this year we made them each a raised bed of their own. They each planted what the bunny brought and were allowed to pick out anything else that they wanted until they ran out of room. Some of the extras they picked out were strawberry, rhubarb, sarano peppers, 2 unusual varieties of tomatoes, kholrabi, spagetti squash, swiss chard and cow peas. Not that any of those are really odd but who picked out what is what makes it shocking.

We really try to keep them interested in where food comes from. They may never do any of this once they get older but atleast they will know how. Also it is a much healthier diet and they are young enough that I can control that.

Right now the other thing they are working on/learning about are chickens, ducks, rabbits and turkeys. We have 8 new chicks, 5 new ducklings, 3 new rabbits and will have 4 turkeys the 5th of May. Hopefully all the chicks will make it. What ever makes it, that many of the older girls are going to go. The turkey are new to us. Hopefully they will not be as difficult as all the reading about them we have done says. We are researching now on sheep for next year.

sussexman's picture
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Sheep?

Now you are really talking. Sheep are the most economically sound animal to have. First you have the wool, then the milk from which you can make butter and some of the finest cheese you will ever taste. And lastly you have the lamb. I have just finished the last lamb in my freezer and will be getting my stock in of this season's lamb. Sheep are not difficult as long as you remember they are a food not a pet. I tried to get Larry into sheep but he was worried about state laws. If you have an orchard you can use the sheep to keep the grass down. Over here they keep sheep in churchyards to keep the grass down. Do they do that in the US. Anyways good luck with your trials. And hope you don't get any tribulations.
Sussexman

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