bird flocks splitting up

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Joined: 2009-08-07

I was wondering if the same is happening on your side of the pond.
Ever since the snow has com and the temperatures have dropped drastically over here the birds that normally come in flocks such as starlings are coming from their night roosts as a large flock and then splitting up into two's or three's to feed. Then at eventime they rjoin the main flock for the night.
Perhaps they have worked it out that with the scarce food at any one place there wouldn't be enough for the whole flock but enough for a few.
Normally I get anything from 30-50 starlings in my garden now only 3 or 4 at a time.
House sparrows are also doing the same. Perhaps one of you wise persons may have a logical answer to this event.
Keep Feeding the birds.
Sussexman.
The picture on the left is of my cat scarer.Chance

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Not Here in NW NJersey

BUT, I do see them flocking up hugely before bad storms.

I think you're right about the feeding grounds idea.

Chance is beautiful! :star:

My collie didn't like cats either, but didn't know what to do with the ferrets, so when they nipped her hocks, she'd sit on them with this woeful look! Is Chance male or female, and who's idea is what looks like a rubber chicken?

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Joined: 2009-08-07
That there chicken is a turkey called IVY

Chance is a male Rough Collie, he will be 13 years old on 25/01/2010. We have had him since he was 5, he is a rescue dog. His father was Best in show at Cruffts in 1996 and Chance has a pedigree as long as your arm. But we didn't know that till after we had adopted him. He is a real beauty and so good natured. His previous owner was an elderly lady who lived with her chidren and because Chance was unable to accept babies she had to let him go. We are in contact with her and every Christmas send her a card from Chance telling her what he has been up to and photos.When we first got him he was so nervous that he wouldn't get in the back seat of my saloon. So don't laugh but I gave the saloon away and bought an estate, he hops up in the back easy. So the dog cost me £80 but the estate £8000. But only other solution was to take him back and that was never going to happen.
Now the rubber toy was his Xmas pressy from my daughter. It is a female turkey, dressed in a dress (with cleavage) and a red christmas hat. And it squeaks. Chance has a toy box full of squeaky toys. Is he spoilt, not a 'chance'.
I hope I haven't sent you to sleep with all this but he is really a great pal to me.
Sussexman

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Don't Even think it!

It's a great story Colin, not a bore at all!

I should've known it was a squeak toy with a name!

I too got mine Carli as a rescue (from beating & neglect) and also had a good pedigree but not a grand one like Chance's. And I perfectly understand the change of vehicle.

I broke down one day with Carli in the back of my VW bug, we'd hit a bit of oil on a just starting rainy road, spun off the side into a flat puddle! 4th gear of course stuck. So luckily I had to walk about 1/4 mile up the road to Eagle Towing. The tow was due to be back soon, so they invited me in for a cup of coffee. I was soon surrounded by collies ... all related to mine! The mother collie always had large litters, and Carli was last at 13. Finally the tow guy made it home, we hopped in, and all he had to due was give me nudge so I could shift the gears ... and he didn't charge me, but I tipped $10.

And Carli was still guarding the back seat. :love:

It's sweet of you to send a Christmas card like that, I'm sure it's very appreciated.:santa:

Give Chance a hug from me!

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Joined: 2009-08-07
RE: 13 years old,

My Lab mix Pim is 13, he still thinks he is a puppy though! And what a better of a pal could there be than a dog than an old dog?

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