Dryness/Drought

11 replies [Last post]
Redmink's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07

I had noticed in the long-range forecast for the Atlantic Corridor that just about every month in the upcoming year had less than average rainfall. Now as a weather journaler, I can say that the predictions overall are pretty accurate.

So I was glad to see that TOFA has these articles ... seems wise to start planning ahead.

http://www.almanac.com/content/watering-devices-do-it-yourself

http://www.almanac.com/content/water-wise-garden

http://www.almanac.com/content/when-water-vegetables

http://www.almanac.com/content/rain-barrels-harvest-your-water

sussexman's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Dryness/Drought

Over here in sunny sussex the ground is so dry that I have had to put on hold any planting I wish to do. Except for containers. All our local resevoirs are very low, if we don't get decent rain soon we could be in trouble. Also because it is clay the rain either pans or just runs off the surface of the soil.
Sussexman

Redmink's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Clay

I hear that; I'd wondered if that wasn't the same problem the SE USA like Georgia was having. Sounds like you need water barrels under gutter spouts and soaker hoses.

sussexman's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Clay

The rain has at last come. Now I am waiting for it to stop.
We gardeners are never satisfied are we.
I can get some plants in now, I want to transplant some foxgloves that are crowding out the surrounding summer plantings. They grow like weeds here. Also hollyhocks I have grown from seed.
I watch the plants and ignore what is printed on the packets. I sow hollyhocks in August when the plants are setting seed then plant out in October, then they flower in june/July. The established ones will flower inJuly August so I will get a progression. I do the same with Sweet Williams. Do you grow them over where you are. They are great as a cut flower as you can cut them and come again if you know what I mean.
You see as winter approaches I dream of summer.
If Larry's pond freezes he can go skating yes.
Colin

Redmink's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Busy Busy Busy

Sure we're satisfied, else there would be no moving on to the next thing!

Some folks grow hollyhocks and sweet williams, foxgloves may not be as popular as gladiolas. I like the progressive planting that you've achieved, very nice!!

Where I lived in Pennsylvania, bleeding hearts grew like weeds in any woodsy patch they could find, so beautiful.

I too think of the next season ... sometimes helps defray the burdens of the current one.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Around here,

We have been having quite a bit of moisture recently, 1 1/2 inches in the last week, but my uncle told me this mourning we were behind normal precipitation by around 3" for the year. Just the same this has been the wettest year we've had recently, and my new pond is still filling up nicely. I think the pond is around 3 feet deep now, and has another foot to foot and a half before it begins to over flow.

Redmink's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Evaporation

Larry, don't you have low humidity up there, and doesn't that suck up the water out of the pond? I'm just trying to think of ways that can be avoided ...

Do you have a pipe siphon or something to direct the overflow to plants/trees?

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
RE: Evaporation,

Yes, I do have low humidity,,,much of the time very low, and when the wind blows the water level can drop 6" in a single day.

No, I don't have anything to divert the water, not much of any way to do so either, the low side of the pond is up against a hill.

I still need to go and get it and get it going, but my friend who got the gravel from me has finally said I could try the used pump he has to see if I want it in trade for the gravel.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
RE: Evaporation,

Yes, I do have low humidity,,,much of the time very low, and when the wind blows the water level can drop 6" in a single day.

No, I don't have anything to divert the water, not much of any way to do so either, the low side of the pond is up against a hill.

I still need to go and get it and get it going, but my friend who got the gravel from me has finally said I could try the used pump he has to see if I want it in trade for the gravel.

Redmink's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
So Many Projects ...

...So Little Time!

BUT, before I get frustrated, I remember that "a job well started is a job half done." :)

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Re: A Job Half Done,

Isn't that the truth! That's why it's best to divide the big jobs up into little jobs!

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Re: A Job Half Done,

Isn't that the truth! That's why it's best to divide the big jobs up into little jobs!

Post new comment

Before posting, please review all comments. Due to the volume of questions, Almanac editors can respond only occasionally, as time allows. We also welcome tips from our wonderful Almanac community!

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Links to specified hosts will have a rel="nofollow" added to them.

More information about formatting options

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.