Horses

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Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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After finding an ad for some horses today I've decided to look into maybe getting some, I've thought about it before, but am more seriously thinking about it again.

Redmink's picture
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Gets My Vote!

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Wow, that's neat Larry! I grew up with 'em in my backyard, worked at a riding stable, drove a team for the carriage, during college ...

Are you doing this for just pleasure, or do you plan on putting them to work skidding rocks, logs and dirt?

And aged manure is great for some plants too.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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RE: Are you doing this for,,,

I mostly want to do this for my nephew and for vegetation control, but getting the manure for the garden/trees would be good too!

I still need to get the rest of my place fenced off first, and I'm not sure how well vegetated my place would stay with a horse here all the time,,,,I've worked so hard at getting the grass etc. filled in here!

Redmink's picture
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Kids & Horses

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Kids & horses do go well together, but you're right, you need good grazing. It's often typical to have 2 acres, separately fenced, so that you can alternate and let the grass refresh itself.

Walking/eating is very essential to good horse health.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Thanks!

That's kind of the plan I was thinking of, but around here unless you have irrigated pasture the grass only grows mostly in the spring, and lots of hay will need to be fed to the horse(s).

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Still thinking,,,

I'm still thin king on getting animals, but not sure if they will be horses or not, my mom is going to dig out the subdivision rules for me, so I can see all the can's and cant's as it's been 4 years since I moved in! Smaller animals that would eat less would be better, and I originally wanted Goats and Ducks anyway. Just have to get planing,,,,and come up with some way of getting some fence up (not to mention the animals themselves)!

Redmink's picture
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RE: Still Thinkin'

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Winter's so good for planning.

Why no chickens? Or is it that you want more pet type critters?

Just a thought, but what about predators in your area? Not really a problem?

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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RE: Still Thinking,,,

Yes, I agree, winter is definitely good for planning!:)

I would rather eat duck eggs, as my brother tells me they are better eating, but the subdivision rules clearly state no foul (or goats, so I can't have either animal I really want). So as far as birds go, I am back to my wild birds!

Animals I can have include horses, cattle, and sheep. Other animals I couldn't have are hogs (icky, but good "tractors"), mules, donkeys, and lamas.

Not many predators around here, but animals with some ability to protect themselves would be good.

Redmink's picture
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Beastie Choices

Well, at least you have the rules, disappointing as they are.

I vote for donkeys! A friend of mine had one as companion for her horse, and they're more predictable than llamas.

Do Pot Belly Pigs count as hogs (I hope)? They are great too!! Another friend had both the pig and an Irish Setter and they were great pals.

Having fun with this Larry?

sussexman's picture
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You'll just have to be a sheep man.

Larry, the many advantages of sheep is that you get wool, meat and milk. The sheep milk is a lot better for you than cow's milk. If you can get the services of a tup then you will have fresh lamb. That is god's own meat. I am of course assuming these sheep aren't going to be pets. Take a tip from me don't give them names, number them. Else you will never be able to slaughter them. But take care in selecting the breed, some will live anywhere but others are more demanding. Keep planning and dreaming.
Sussexman

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Sheep milk!

You don't hear that very often, in fact I'm not even sure I knew you could collect sheep milk to drink!
And don't forget the lanolin!
I'm worried that I would get too attached to them even if I didn't name them,,,just have to hope I don't run short of food if I do!

Sure I'm having fun Redmink!

Redmink's picture
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Attachments

Good to hear you're havin' fun!

Llamas make great sheepherders out West, I've seen a bunch of stories where they kick the crap out of wolves.

I'm afraid I have the same problem with attachments too ... except for ornery attack-roosters!

Good advice Colin!! :-D

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Llamas,,,,

Llamas would be fun, and they have really good wool,,,to bad about the rules!

sussexman's picture
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Problem solved for larry

Hey Larry why don't you keep reindeer. Now the list of advantages is overwelming. Hide, meat, milk, horn and so on.
Plus you could get a good living out of hiring them out at Christmas to all those Santa Claus dads who want to impress their kids.
Worth thinking about.considering you are growing grass for wild deer, why not grow it for reindeer.
Keep dreaming Spring is just around the corner.
Sussexman

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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RE: Reindeer,,,

That sounds like fun, but might be more hassle than it's worth to get through the government red tape. I will though re-read the rules as a start to looking into game farming,,,not that I really want to get into that kind of thing, just that I think I should explore all the options!

Elsie in Ohio's picture
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Joined: 2009-08-11
horses

are A LOT of work and expensive.
do you have experience with horses and a farrier available?
I like my chickens and pig and ducks and french guineas. these are enough for me. Just hate hauling water in buckets in the cold here in Ohio. The outside hose faucet keeps freezing up and we have to thaw it out with a propane torch. Way too cold here in Ohio. I can't imagine trying to keep animals in water in Minnesota.
Poor things can't drink ice. The ducks have tried!!
Check out Craigslist for "free" animals if you are of a mind....just be careful. Some people get rid of their sick or injured animals this way for free and could cost you a ton but there good deals there........

Thanks,
Elsie ./.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Thanks Elsie!

There is a lot of market for pasture for horses around here, and I've been thinking recently about maybe after getting the place fenced, to lease it for a while at a time as horse pasture before actually getting animals of my own.

I was thinking that I could wait to rent it out till the grass went to seed, since horse manure is notorious for sprouting seeds, and again renting it out over the winter months.

If my new pond and water pump can keep my place irrigated enough to keep the grass green more months of the year I will have more grazing to sell, just have to wait and see!

If I do end up renting it out as pasture, I'll be sure and set aside the money from it to fund the animals I will get later on, as well as a barn of sorts, can't get too fancy on pasture rent from a few acres but maybe a shed?

I think Colin was right about sheep, but want to find out more about this sheep milk!

The town where I was raised was the woolen capitol of the world around 110 years ago, and my ancestors were a part of this, but I know little of sheep myself!

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Over seeding the place,

Even though I've had good luck multiplying the wild grasses, I've been over seeding the place with the most of a 50 lb. bag of annual rye grass that was left over from a failed attempt to grow a fall crop of green manure the fall before last.
The grass seed didn't germinate till spring, and made a waste of my efforts.

The rye grass will only be temporary fill in in-between the wild grasses, but it might stick around anyway, as I like to let the grass go to seed before cutting.

I also plan on getting some 50 lb. bags of sheep fescue, and more 50 lb. bags of the yellow sweet clover like I put out one bag of last year.
The sooner I get them and get them applied with my fertilizer spreader the better, as I am relying on the frost action to cover the seeds for germination.

I am also thinking of getting a 50 lb. bag of white dutch clover, but it is more expensive, so I'm not sure it will be worth the effort and expense for a vegetation that is such a small amount of additional grazing :exmark:

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Wild flower seed,

I also put out some Montana Native Wildflower Seeds, those should all be smart enough to wait till a good time to come up too :exmark:

I hope they will survive to add a bit of color to the landscape :exmark:

Redmink's picture
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RE: Wildflowers

Well, if they're from Montana, you should be in good shape!

Color would be really nice, maybe they'll attract butterflies?

It's funny that our germination period is just about over and you still have time!!

Clover is verrrrry popular grazing. It just reminded me of the time we trucked some horses up to a summer pasture, 100 acres, with 5 of it in alfalfa. The horses didn't head for their usual spot, they headed right for the alfalfa!! I had to run like the wind to get that gate closed before they all got in there. (made it too!) ;-)

Wow, I hadn't thought of that in a lonnng time ...

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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RE: ,,,Attract butterflies?

That would be nice, I already have some Monarch Butterflies coming around from all the weeds in the milkweed family :exmark:

:star: ,,,Bees being around more to pollinate my veggies when they bloom would be good too :exmark:

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