New Gardener Here!! And guess what, I have questions :P

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Joined: 2011-04-17

Started a vegetable garden for the first time and it was a spur of the moment thing. Mostly to help keep the grocery bill down. I have read 20 pages of the forums and still have some questions. First, my garden is about 6'x25'. We have Carrots, beets, cucumbers, okra, squash, corn, and a few onions. From reading about corn it looks like thats the biggest challenge. I tilled the area, raked out as much grass, tilled in peat moss and black cow compost manure. In about 4 or 5 days the corn, beets, cucumbers, and okra sprouted. Yesterday saw squash and carrots too! Everyday I have been pulling out leftover grass that is trying to grow back from roots that I missed. So doing good so far on that.

Now, a few general questions and few gardening questions.

1)I see some people order seeds. Why not just go to feed and seed store or local hardware store and where do you order seeds from?

2)I see some people talking about what zones they live in. Where do I find this info? Oh I'm from Jax, Fl.

3)When we first started with the corn, we put a few seeds in one hole (we didnt know, lol). They are now about 3" tall. Would now be a good time to carefully space them out or should I wait longer?

4)We want to keep the garden organic and I have seen a few posts that say use Neem Oil. Can this be used on the listed plants above? any other suggestions on what to use?

5)For next set of vegetables that will be grown, I seen where you have to rotate your crops around. Does this mean "Don't plant same type of plant again in same spot" or "Don't plant at all in the area that I just harvested?"

Thanks in advance for any advice/answering questions. Ultimatly I want to expand my garden to about 30'x30' if all goes well.

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Joined: 2009-08-07
You have just started the

You have just started the most agravating, enjoyable, and addicting thing ever! :)

1...Sometimes the local seed stores do not have a variety that you want. The only thing that we ordered this year is tomatillo seed because I couldn't find any locally. I use the following site to decide who I order from...it let's you know what companies are doing great or who has complaints.... http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/

2...You can google garden zone map. I think you are in zone 9....but you may want to double check.

3...We usually drop 2-3 seeds in each hole for corn also. Once they get a couple inches tall, my husband will weed them down to 1. I am not sure if they can be moved to another spot, but I do know he doesn't do that.

4....I am clueless on the Neem oil.

5...It means not to plant the same crop in that spot next year. Different crops pull and replace different things into the ground. If you always plant the same thing in that spot it eventually get off balance and not grow as well. We often have more than one crop in a spot each year. For example, after the potatoes are dug up we usually plant purple hull peas in that spot.

Hope this helped some. There are many here who know much more than I even attempt to figure out. :)

YB
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Joined: 2009-08-07
More advice..

#3 Corn does not like to be transplanted especially if one needs to separate roots. Just leave them be.. they should be fine.

#4 Neem oil, I have not used this but have read up on it. I would suggest Googling Neem oil. Some sellers will list what not to use it on.

#5 Rotation is good however, there are some plants that you cannot have growing side by side and some plants cannot be planted where another plant has been for a couple of years. Again Googling will get you the most information on this.

Stay tuned for more advice I'm sure is on the way.

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Joined: 2011-04-17
awesome! thanks YB and Mom

awesome! thanks YB and Mom

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Joined: 2011-04-17
awesome! thanks YB and Mom

awesome! thanks YB and Mom

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Neem

Neem is great for ornamentals but I wouldn't use it on food crops. You can take the skins of citrus fruit such as oranges and grapefruits and boil them down. Strain the liquid and put it in a spray bottle to spray your plants. You can also add crushed garlic or even garlic powder to the mixture. The smell of the garlic alone will keep EVERYTHING away and it is perfectly safe on food crops.

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Neem is now considered,

safe for food crops, after all it is an all natural product!

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