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Oaks from Acorns ?

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5 replies [Last post]
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Joined: 2009-08-17

I live in S. Oregon and would like to grow an oak from the many acorns that are now falling. Any suggestions? Should I try "rooting" indoors and then transplant?
Thanks,

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Yes, Sounds Good

You can use a glass or glass jar with moist paper towels in it (a little water added each day too), to soften up the shell.

Soon you should see a little bit of plant poking out looking to root itself.

Or totally imitate Nature by putting a bunch of acorns on top of a flower pot filled with dirt --well watered -- and lay dry leaves over the top, as rooting is best in the dark. Keep warm indoors, check moisture level and mist dirt with water as needed.

Good luck! :)

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Joined: 2009-08-17
Oaks from acorns?

Thanks Redmink.
In the jar, should I cover the acorns w/the wet paper towel, or just rest them on top of it?

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Sprouting

You want a moist environment, so top and bottom is good, with a light lid of tinfoil just resting on top. What with a warm & dark spot, daily check for mold and wipe out of jar.

Let us know how it goes! I've had acorns as well as maple seeds land in my planter boxes and take hold without a problem.

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Joined: 2009-08-17
Oaks from Acorns?

A couple of the acorns in the glass jar have begun to crack and open. At what point should I place them in soil? And, should I plant them in an indoor container and then transplant them in the Spring?

Thanks for your help. This is pretty exciting.

Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Wow!

So exciting!! You don't want the little sprouts to break off, so put them in well-watered, well-draining soil now, deep indoor container is good (do you have bucket-style or an old bucket?).

Still keep them warm and dark, as the roots need to get going first.

Check daily for top sprouts and put in partial shade, don't want to burn them! As it matures, it might get leggy, so you can gradually move them toward more light. But don't constantly move plants around, it can really interrupt them.

Good luck, you've got a great start. :) :)


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