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plowing

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Joined: 2010-02-24

I'm going to plow up new garden space this year.When is the best time to turn the sod over to get best weed and grass control? Thanks Mike

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Joined: 2009-08-07
1st, Remove Sod, Don't Plow Under

Overview

Weeds quickly destroy neat garden beds. They rob the soil of nutrients and choke out the roots of your desired garden plantings. Dealing with weeds quickly before they have a chance to get a deep hold in your garden is the best defense. New beds are more weed prone than older, established beds. After growing in a section of garden for several years, weed problems will diminish but you must stay on top of them to keep them from taking over again.

Step 1

Prepare new beds for planting. Cut out and remove any sod layers from the bed before tilling. Turn over the top layer of soil and remove any weed stems or roots in the soil. Weeds might grow back from these parts if left in place.

Step 2

Lay black plastic or garden weed cloth over areas overrun with weeds. The plastic heats the ground under it and kills the weeds. This might take an entire season to work effectively.

Step 3

Surround beds with edging. Edging keeps lawn weeds from moving into flower beds. Use wood, plastic or stone edging that extends 4 or more inches into the soil around the beds.

Step 4

Weed often. A weeding tool is a long pole with a forked end. Push it into the soil next to the weed stalk. Lever the weed out, pushing the forked end against the weed stem and roots under ground. Dig weeds as soon as you notice them -- and before they go to seed -- so they have no time to reproduce.

Step 5

Use mulch. Inorganic mulch such as gravel or organic mulches such as bark preserve moisture in the soil and keep weeds down. Lay down a weed barrier cloth first, then add the mulch for additional protection in weed-prone areas.

Step 6

Use herbicides. Use caution with herbicides around children or pets and follow all package instructions. Organic herbicides also are available. Be aware that some herbicides might damage your plants as well as the weeds.

From: http://www.gardenguides.com/68082-rid-weeds-flower-beds.html

Hope this helps, Happy Gardening :)

Offline
Joined: 2010-02-25
Redmink's advice is

Redmink's advice is excellent!!! I've made the mistake of turning sod under. And, it made for quite the pain in the butt trying to control the weeds!

If the spot is too big to remove the sod from, you can always use a herbicide to kill existing weeds before plowing. I've done this too. But, the herbicides will do nothing to prevent the seeds that are in the sod from sprouting and becoming a pain... and they will do that!!

For a new garden spot, my best advice to you is to keep a good hoe handy... a good sharp hoe!!!

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Sod this...

If you do remove the top layer of 'sod' place them upside down in a tidy stack and cover with black plastic. The weeds will be starved of daylight and die and rot down and after a couple of years the pile will become good loam then just spread it on your garden. You will never stop weeds, after all a weed is just a plant growing in the wrong place. Also if you make your garden into a desert the slugs will be out in force to dine on your lush plants. After all you've taken their normal food(weeds) away they don't know the difference. Plants are just food to them.
Sussexman
Dream a lot Dig a little

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