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Red sandy soil

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6 replies [Last post]
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Joined: 2010-03-10

My yard has one heck of a hill with barely anything growing. A few sprigs of grass/weeds. What can I plant on a hill that is sandy red Georgia soil? Is there anything I can broadcast to hold the soil and help with erosion?

Thanks

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Red sandy soil

You never said how big your yard is. Have you given any thought to making raised beds across the hill. this would allow you to improve the soil you wish to grow on and help stop the erosion.

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Joined: 2010-03-10
The area I'm writing about is

The area I'm writing about is the length of a football field.
I had not thought of raised beds good idea.
Thanks

YB
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Joined: 2009-08-07
One person on here planted her whole garden,,,,

in Hay bales.. or was it straw bales?

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Straw bales,

Straw bales, and yes those would stop erosion too. Not to mention the fact that once they decayed too much to continue to grow in you could scatter them out as mulch and get new ones to grow in. The straw bales would be less initial investment, but would lead to more upkeep costs.

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Joined: 2009-08-07
as most of you know

I am the straw bale queen...lol. They do decompose and are excellent to use for mulch after you have harvested your veggies. I'm recycling mine into raised flower beds.

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Beach Pea

Beach Pea seems to grow in anything. It does spread, and gets to about 1.5 feet high, and falls a bit over so that the greens and pink pea flowers fill in blank spaces in the dirt.

Here's a website that might help you:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG1114.html

Grasses seem to be their choice, but they include vining/runner type plants and some bushes.

Good Luck :)


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