tiller vs cultivator

12 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07

can someone tell me the difference between them. it seems though they are the same. i want to purchase one in the spring

YB
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Here's the difference

First, I own both.

A tiller is for digging deep into hard soil to break it up into fine soil.

A cultivator is for weeding and taking on the first inch or two of soil to kill weed roots.

I till my soil in the spring to get ready for seeding and planting then I use the cultivator to keep the weeds down throughout the season.

Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Both in one,

Some machines do both in one, I know Troy built makes some that do,,,,my Troy built doesn't, and now I wish I had gotten one that did!

Offline
Joined: 2010-03-07
tillers

I just read an article on-line that said that rotor tilling your garden is a bad thing. It is supposed to destroy the micro bugs, water pathways etc. in the soil. Anybody know anything about this?

YB
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Joined: 2009-08-07
I haven't however...

I have not been tilling my garden unless I am planting long row beds like garlic. I have been digging deep wide holes adding a lot of compost then planting. Not tilling is suppose to help keep the weeds down by making the soil to hard to grow in and not exposing weed seeds to the light.

Offline
Joined: 2010-05-28
post holes

is there such a thing as the best time for digging post
holes.

YB
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
when the ground is not wet or frozen.

I dig mine when ever I have time.

Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Post Holes Time

That's usually how it goes YB, it's not the fun job (and then there's that big rock just waiting to be struck!).

How about after the Full Moon though, that helps. Supposed to make sure they stay down ... don't wanna do it any more times than necessary.

YB
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
I never did believe in that stuff.

I have dug many post holes and never had one "come up"

Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Another stupid question coming

Why do you dig holes for your posts? What I do is hit them in with a post punch. It looks a bit like a metal tube with two handles, one on each side. One end is blocked. You place the open end over the post and the weight of the punch drives the post in. This works with wood posts up to 8ft in height and 4 ins in diameter. If the ground is dry water it. This means you haven't loosened the soil and the post will last longer than if set in concrete.
By the way YB why do you need so many post holes, guess you just like digging.
Sussexman

Offline
Joined: 2010-08-16
old fence

I have a fence that has never been had sealent on it. half of it still looks ok both the other most of it is worped or dry rotted including some post. do i need to dig up all the post and replace them?

YB
Offline
Joined: 2009-08-07
Welcome to the forums Flemflam....

In my opinion, if half have gone bad the others can't be to far behind.
If you have the cash I would replace the whole thing and seal it this time round.

If you don't have the cash and you can find a matching fence, you could replace half now (including sealing it) then do the other half when it gives out.

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Joined: 2010-06-24
Tilling is generally

Tilling is generally preperation for beds while cultivation generally refers to weeding.

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