Veggies for sandy soil?

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Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Joined: 2009-08-07

What veggies/herbs grow well in sandy soil?

TxBob's picture
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Joined: 2009-08-07
Veggies in sandy soil

Hi Larry - I thought your garden was in rocks??

Couple of years ago I had a garden in sandy soil & I grew just about anything.

Tomatoes, Cabbage, Califlower, Peppers, Cukes, potatoes,(several types of squash), Canteloupe, Watermelons, Strawberries,Beans, Onions, Brocolli, Carrots & just about anything that will grow in dirt.

TxBob

sussexman's picture
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Veggies in sandy soil?

I think TxBob you just might have forgotten to mention the cart loads of humus you must have put in the beds to grow that range of veggies.
Unfortunately sandy soil drains far too easily so to grow roots it can be an advantage but many of the legumes, pumpkins and squashes would need good trenches of humus to put their feet into and suck up the moisture. Me I'm on good sussex clay, in winter it grabs your boots and hangs on and in summer goes like iron. Same rules apply though plenty of humus breaks up the particles then it is second to none.
Good luck Larry, how are those stone walls getting on? and how many sheep have you got, guess we'll be calling you Larry lamb soon. And grow some mint to go with them.
Sussexman

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Thanks!

Thanks Bob, your giving me quite a bit of encouragement :exmark:

Thanks Colin, some of your points were just what I was afraid of, and others were just what I was thinking :exmark:
As for those stone fences, the snow and frozen ground has still been keeping me from getting back at making them :exmark:
:star: No sheep yet, but Mint flavored lamb,,,,YUM :exmark:

James K Smith's picture
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Larrys Rock Garden w Veggies in sandy soil

Larry - as sussexman said you'll proabebly need some humus added to hold the moisture. Check with your local Ag Extension Service [on line or by mail] for YOUR area. Sometimes you need to be carefull of what you amend your "ground" with, especially fertalizers &/or chemicals. Some chemicals used in your water supply can react causing detramental results for your intended crops.
I'm just learning about sand & gardening myself here in Arizona + we've got a lot of heat. The Ag Svc. here has on line info and free garden classes. Be sure to check yours out - it's your taxes at work.
They have helped me a lot - had some nice veggies my 1st year and hoping to good this year too - but watch them rabbits they like thir veggies.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Thanks James!

I have already begun growing Micro-algea (nitrogen fixing) in the area, it will take a few years for humus to build up from it, but it should make good rich soil, I have had good luck with building up the soil with the Micro-algea elsewhere on the place.

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Joined: 2009-08-07
sandy soil

Oh please, we live in north Fl, the sandy soil of all sandy soil, we plant over an acre, peas love this soil, so do potatoes, cukes, squash, radish, you name it, it grows very very good, just need to make sure if no rain, water good every day.oh ya, tons of watermelon, tomatoes, etc, etc.

Larrys Rock Garden's picture
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Thanks Linda!

I'm going to try for sure the peas, potatoes and squash there, they all love water, and the bank of the pond where it always stays moist will be a fun experiment for me!

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