SNOW V RAIN

6 replies [Last post]
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Joined: 2010-01-12

I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO FIND OUT HOW MANY INCHES OF RAIN PER INCHES OF SNOW?

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Joined: 2009-08-06
Generally, the rule is: 10

Generally, the rule is:
10 inches of snow = 1 inch of rain.

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Joined: 2009-08-07
Depends ...

Depends on where you live, and what kind of snow, fluffy or small or in between.

I get a fair idea by checking the local weather station's "precip amount", take a measurement at my house and then divide to see what my water-to-snow ratio is.

The general rule works, but here's some more detail:

(1)

Q> How much snow does it take to equal an inch of rain?

A> This varies depending on the type of snow, but to make 1 inch of water (rain), you need 10 inches of average snow, 4 to 5 inches of wet snow, or 15 inches of powdery snow.

(2)

Q> How does a weather forecaster predict how many inches of snow will fall?

A> The process involves a lot of math. Forecasting snowfall is done by applying very complicated mathematical equations to known variables such as temperature, wind, and moisture content of the air. In the early days of forecasting, these computations were done by hand and with slide rules. Now forecasters use high-speed computers and have a much higher degree of accuracy -- about 85 percent.

Bob Mabry
35% better than flipping a

35% better than flipping a coin...LOL

corey cincinnati#1
snow

Winter is made for snow you guys down south in joy your rain an cold is below 60 wee are in t-shirts an you all freezing an snow is so beautiful your missing it! Merry x-mas too all an happy new an safe 2014

Rod Simonson
snow amount relates to rain amount

Is there a graph somewhere that shows the relationship between the amount of snow received during the winter corresponding to the amount of rain received during the summer?

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Joined: 2014-03-20
The weather in Canada

Hello we have had alot of snow here in Canada. Some very cold day's. I dress up extra warm for those day's.

Today is the first of spring and hopefully the snow won't be here too much longer.

Elizabeth;

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