What Are Meteor Showers: Facts About Shooting Stars

PrintPrintEmailEmail
Your rating: None Average: 3.9 of 5 (23 votes)

We see meteor showers, or shooting stars, when the Earth travels though clouds of particles left by comets (or asteroids).

Since Earth's orbit is virtually the same from year to year, the showers are predictable.

A meteor shower appears to originate from a single point in the sky, the "radiant". Meteors seen near the radiant are approaching the observer and will appear as short streaks in the sky. However, meteors seen 45 to 135 degrees from the radiant are moving in a more parallel direction to the observer. These meteors will produce longer streaks in the sky.

Meteor showers are usually named for the constellation in which their radiant lies at the time of shower maximum. Thus, the Leonid meteor shower (peaking about November 18) will appear to radiate from the constellation Leo.

  • The best and most reliable showers are the Perseids, between August 11 and 13.
     
  • Another good display is the Geminids, between December 13 and 14.

See our Meteor Showers Guide here for the dates of all the principal meteor showers during the year.

You'll see the most meteors on a clear, dark night during a new Moon. If you live near a brightly lit city, drive away from the lights and toward the constellation from which the meteors will appear to radiate.

To see the most meteors, watch as late in the nighttime as you can, up till dawn. To view a shower, the meteor shower radiant must be above the horizon—most radiants are up by around midnight.

Grab and lawn chair and look up: Most meteor showers are very fast! They flash by in a second or less.

Find a Meteorite!

If a meteor enters the Earth's atmosphere and reaches the Earth's surface without vaporizing, it's called a meteorite.

Every day, dozens of small meteorites fall to the Earth. Those that are seen coming down are called "falls." Those that are recovered on the ground are called "finds." Here's how to find them:

  • Tape a strong magnet to the end of a broom handle. A meteorite contains a lot of iron, so it will stick to your magnet.
  • If it's an ordinary rock with lots of iron, it may stick too. You can tell a meteorite by its fusion crust, a thin, glassy coating that formed when the meteorite superheated during its fall through Earth's atmosphere.

Fun Meteorite Facts

  • The largest meteorite ever found in the United States weighed 15 tons and was found in 1902 in Willamette, Oregon.
  • Since 1978, teams of scientists have collected over 15,000 meteorite specimens from Antarctica. They are easier to find on that continent's snow-white surface.
  • One of Canada's most notable meteorites was found near Tagish Lake in northern British Columbia by Jim Brook on January 25, 2000. He almost mistook it for wolf poop.

Don't worry. Most meteors are very small and the Earth is huge. Despite the current hype, and many rumors, there has been only one confirmed case of a meteor actually hitting anyone.

See this article on the meteorite that crashed into Russia in February, 2013.

Related Articles

More Articles:

Comments

When will the next meteor

By Dalia7

When will the next meteor shower be visible in Toronto?

See our meteor guide here:

By Almanac Staff

See our meteor guide here: http://www.almanac.com/content/meteor-showers-guide You can see these meteors from anywhere in the sky.

when in August is the best

By lorna lacey

when in August is the best time to watch for a meteor shower from timberline lodge on mt. hood Oregon

The Perseids fall in August

By Almanac Staff

The Perseids fall in August every year. They are usually around August 11-12 and the biggest shower of the year.

Would anyone know WHERE to

By Mirtha soyka

Would anyone know WHERE to go, to see meteor shower in Pembroke Pines, fla, please? Txs! Since it has to be in a dark, away from City lights spot?

To answer the most common

By Almanac Staff

To answer the most common question: Yes, you can see these meteor showers from ANYWHERE in the sky, provided it's clear and dark, away from all the city lights. The big PERSEID meteor shower (the best of the year) is NOW (Aug 11-12-13). Good luck catching a falling star!  See the link to the Meteor Shower Guide above for more viewing tips.

Wish I could see any of the

By Puteri Amira

Wish I could see any of the meteor showers before I die. Aurora too.

I am going to camp angelfish

By Chris lopes

I am going to camp angelfish August 12-17 when can I see a shooting star?

You're in luck. The Perseid

By Almanac Staff

You're in luck. The Perseid Meteor Showers (one of the best and most reliable) happen August 11 and 12. Here's hoping for clear skies! See the Meteor Shower Chart here: http://www.almanac.com/content/meteor-showers-guide

I have always wanted to see

By Ronald LaCourse

I have always wanted to see meteor showers, but living in the city with much lights causes a blindness. Now I think I am living in an area where my back yard becomes dark, so, perhaps this year.

The Perseids are around the

By Almanac Staff

The Perseids are around the corner! Best of luck with dark skies. See the Meteor Shower Chart for details: http://www.almanac.com/content/meteor-showers-guide

Post new comment

Before posting, please review all comments. Due to the volume of questions, Almanac editors can respond only occasionally, as time allows. We also welcome tips from our wonderful Almanac community!

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Links to specified hosts will have a rel="nofollow" added to them.

More information about formatting options

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.