Reporting
Depends ...
Depends on where you live, and what kind of snow, fluffy or small or in between. I get a fair idea by checking the local weather station's "precip amount", take a measurement at my house and then divide to see what my water-to-snow ratio is. The general rule works, but here's some more detail: (1) Q> How much snow does it take to equal an inch of rain? A> This varies depending on the type of snow, but to make 1 inch of water (rain), you need 10 inches of average snow, 4 to 5 inches of wet snow, or 15 inches of powdery snow. (2) Q> How does a weather forecaster predict how many inches of snow will fall? A> The process involves a lot of math. Forecasting snowfall is done by applying very complicated mathematical equations to known variables such as temperature, wind, and moisture content of the air. In the early days of forecasting, these computations were done by hand and with slide rules. Now forecasters use high-speed computers and have a much higher degree of accuracy -- about 85 percent.