King Cake

Cake recipe

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Average: 3.7 (10 votes)

This is a French Canadian recipe, Gateau des Rois, which Acadians traditionally serve from Epiphany through Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras). It is different than the New Orleans style of King Cake.

King Cake—also called Kings' Cake, Gateau des Rois, Cake of Kings, or Twelfth Night Cake—is served from the feast of the Epiphany through Mardi Gras. Traditionally, a trinket is baked inside. In the U.S., the most common trinket is a small plastic baby to represent the baby Jesus. In European countries, the traditional trinket is a bean.

In the recipe below, you may swirl molasses cake batter with white cake batter to make a marble cake, or make the molasses cake alone.

Ingredients

1 cup molasses
1 teaspoon baking soda
3 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 cup boiling water
2 1/4 cups flour

Instructions

Mix molasses, baking soda, and butter in a large bowl. Add salt, ginger, and boiling water. Stir well and gradually blend in the flour. Stir until smooth. Pour into a buttered and floured 8- or 9-inch square cake pan (if preparing marble cake, use a 9 x 13-inch pan and drop spoonfuls of each batter in alternate layers). Bake at 350 degrees F (180 degrees C) for about 30 minutes (45 minutes for the marble cake), or until cake tests done. Cool and frost with Fudge icing.

Cooking & Recipes

Yield: 

9-inch square cake

Preparation Method

Occasions

Comments

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Good cake, not too sweet and

Good cake, not too sweet and very easy to make!

Boring. Make traditional

Boring. Make traditional Mexican Three Kings' bread instead. You can find it in any Mexican cookbook. True King's Bread is a yeast dough formed into a circle with fruits and nuts kneaded in and decoratively placed on top of the drizzles icing.

This is a French Canadian

This is a French Canadian recipe, Gateau des Rois, which Acadians traditionally serve from Epiphany through Mardi Gras. It is different than the New Orleans style of King Cake.

This is a much simpler recipe

This is a much simpler recipe than the traqditional NOLA recipe that I have. I wish it had been posted a little sooner as I would have made it for our church Mardi Gras auction last week end even though it is a bit different. The folks here in NY wouldn't know the difference.