Eclipse Dates

When is the next eclipse? See dates for 2017 and 2018 solar and lunar eclipses. The greatest sky spectacle is first Total Solar Eclipse over the U.S. mainland in 38 years.

Overall, in 2017, there will be four eclipses, two of the Sun and two of the Moon. In 2018, there will be five eclipses in 2018, three of the Sun and two of the Moon.

 

What is an Eclipse?

  • A solar eclipse of the Sun occurs when the Moon passes directly in front of the Sun, blocking out its light. Solar eclipses are visible only in certain areas and require eye protection to be viewed safely.
  • A lunar eclipse occurs when the full Moon enters the shadow of Earth, which cuts off all or part of the sunlight reflected off the Moon. Lunar eclipses are technically visible from the entire night side of Earth, but during a penumbral eclipse, the dimming of the Moon’s illumination is slight. Learn more about lunar terminology.

2017 and 2018 Eclipse Dates for North America

August 7, 2017: Partial eclipse of the Moon. This eclipse will not be visible from North America but can be seen from the western Pacific Ocean, Oceania, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Africa, Europe, and easternmost tip of South America.

August 21, 2017: Total eclipse of the Sun This eclipse will be visible from North America. It will begin at 11:47 A.M. EDT and end at 5:04 P.M. All regions of North America will be able to view a partial eclipse at some point during this time span (exact times depend on specific locations). The total eclipse—viewable for up to 2 minutes and 40 seconds at most—will be visible only along a narrow path running southeastward from Oregon to South Carolina and crossing through parts of Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Cities that will experience totality include Salem, OR; Lincoln, NE; Kansas City, Jefferson City, and St. Louis, MO; Nashville, TN; and Columbia and Charleston, SC. The next total solar eclipse visible from North America will occur in 2024.

January 31, 2018: Total Eclipse of the Moon. This eclipse is best observed from central or western North America, because the Moon will set soon after it enters the umbra when observed from eastern North America. The Moon will enter the penumbra at 5:50 A.M. ET (2:50 A.M. PT) and the umbra at 6:48 A.M. ET (3:48 A.M. PT). The Moon will leave the umbra at 10:12 A.M. ET (7:12 A.M. PT)

February 15, 2018: Partial Eclipse of the Sun. This eclipse is not visible from North America but can be viewed from Antarctica, southern South America, and the Falkland Islands.

July 13, 2018: Partial Eclipse of the Sun. This eclipse is not visible from North America but can be viewed from Antarctica, Tasmania, southern South Australia, and Stewart Island.

July 27, 2018: Total Eclipse of the Moon. This eclipse is not visible from North America but can be viewed from Antarctica, Australia, Russia, Asia, Africa, Scandinavia, Europe, and central and eastern South America.