Top 3 Spices to Fight Colds and Flu

Jul 20, 2017
Herbs and Spices for Optimal Health

Herbs and Spices for Optimal Health

Attar Herbs & Spices

Share: 

Rate this Post: 

Average: 4.6 (22 votes)

Did you know that three spices in your pantry fight colds or the flu? Yes, add some healing spices here and there to help you out!

It was a rough winter for colds, flus and bugs in our house. While sometimes a virus just has to run its course, there are some things we can do to help alleviate some symptoms, bring about some comfort and give our bodies what it needs for a recovery to optimal health. As spices became popular for their gastronomic prowess, they were also revered for their medicinal properties and in recent years certain ones have gained popular attention through scientific study for their healing abilities.  

Turmeric

Turmeric, Curcuma longa, may be the most studied spice there is. Turmeric is a rhizome that can be purchased in whole form or in it’s ground and dried form. With it’s deep golden-yellow hue, the spice is considered a healing superstar. The active healing ingredient in turmeric responsible for its preventative and curative abilities is called curcumin. Studies show that curcumin is antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Turmeric is a common ingredient in any Indian curry however you don’t have to wait for a curry to take advantage of turmerics’ healing properties. You can add a teaspoon of turmeric to your scrambled eggs or rice to impart a nice golden hue with a very subtle flavor or toss a sprinkling into your soups, stews or smoothies. The idea is to add in a bit here and there on a daily basis for a consistent boost to your body.

turmeric_ground_0.jpg

Ginger

This righteous rhizome is the root of the Zingiber officinale plant. Ginger is a pungent and warming spice that has garnered a well-deserved reputation for its anti-nausea properties. Whether its morning sickness, motion sickness or simply a queasy belly, ginger in all its forms can offer relief. Ginger is rich in phytonutrients known as gingerol, which are responsible for its pungency and its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties. Settle your stomach with an easy ginger tea that can be made from a few slices of fresh ginger root left to steep in a cup of hot water. A touch of lemon and honey can be added to make it more palatable, especially for young taste buds. Ginger in its fresh or dried and ground form can be added to baked goods, soups stews or smoothies. We just had this divine carrot ginger soup that was nourishing and family friendly. Did you know you that you can grow ginger at home? Simply take a fresh ginger rhizome and break off a piece about 2 inches long. Plant it in sandy soil and water occasionally keeping it slightly moistened. In 4 to 5 weeks the root will start to grow and you can break off a piece as needed. The root will continue to grow.

lemon_ginger.jpg

 

Thyme

With hundreds of different varieties of thyme out there one thing they all have in common is that they contain an important ingredient, thymol. Thymol is the volatile oil responsible for the antiseptic and antimicrobial properties found in the plant species, Thymus vulgaris. Thymol is one of the main ingredients in common mouthwash and many of the cleaning agents on the market. The properties of thymol lend itself to kill germs and fight infection. Using more thyme in cooking is easy. It is prominent in French blends such as herbes de provence or bouquet garni and can be found in most cajun blends as well. In the Middle East, a specific variety of wild thyme referred to as za’atar is one of the main ingredients in a blend of the same name. A few sprinkles of this along with olive oil on toasted pita bread is both heavenly and healthy. There’s no time like the present to pull out your thyme and get cooking, for the health of it.

20161120_144121_2.jpg

So next time you are fighting off a cold, bug or just feeling run down, don’t hesitate to head to your spice pantry and pull out some healing spices to help you out. Always be sure your spices are fresh to maximize their potency and flavor. To learn more about how long spices and herbs keep check out this article.

About This Blog

Melissa Spencer has long had a fascination with plants and doesn’t discriminate between wild, weed or cultivated. She owns Attar Herbs & Spices located in the beautiful Monadnock Region of NH and is celebrating 50 years of service. She actively writes, speaks, and shares ways to infuse herbs and spices into everyday life.

Herbs and Spices really are little bundles of aromatic seeds, barks, berries and leaves. They can enliven the family meal turning the ordinary into the extraordinary and into a fragrant delight of the senses. They can open up a world of exotic cuisines connecting us with faraway cultures and they provide us with amazing health benefits. Follow her blog for endless ways to spice up life for the taste of it, the joy of it, and the health of it.

Reader Comments

Leave a Comment

Growing ginger

How deep should the piece of ginger be planted in the sandy soil? Can be grown indoors or out or both?

Hi David,

Melissa Spencer's picture

Hi David,

You plant the ginger about 1/2” -1” depth in the soil. Be sure to keep the soil slightly moist and keep the pot in a warm environment (about 70F). Ginger is a tropical plant and so certainly if you live in a climate that is conducive (lots of warmth and sun) then the plant can be moved outdoors. I have only grown it indoors because of where I live and it’s still been fun. Here is a video tutorial that might offer you more detailed and visual information for planting ginger. Best of luck! 

Growing ginger

Thank You Melissa!

Moist turkey, crispy skin.

Holiday Dinner Plans
Prize winning Pilgrim Turkey recipe.

 

You will also be subscribed to our Almanac Companion Newsletter

solar_array.jpg

Solar Energy Production Today

158.20 kWh

Live data from the solar array at The Old Farmer's Almanac offices in Dublin, NH.