3 Best Kitchen Tools to Preserve the Harvest

Hand Crank Kitchen Gadgets

Oct 18, 2017
Handcranked Apple Peeler
Shutterstock

Share: 

Rate this Post: 

Average: 4.7 (7 votes)

Frost Dates

Enter a Location

I confess to being a lazy cook. For example, the idea of peeling, coring, and slicing apples makes me a reluctant pie maker. Here are three of my favorite kitchen gadgets to preserve the harvest.

In past years, after spending a few of the most beautiful days of fall inside processing tomatoes, apples, and pears, I could sympathize with Robert Frost when he wrote “I am overtired of the great harvest I myself desired.” He was referring to apples and this year was a banner year for apple growing in my area.

After last season’s non-existent harvest, we were very excited when the apple trees bloomed during a break in the spring rain so the bees could do a proper job pollinating them. We had enough rainfall this summer to reverse last season’s drought and the apples drank it up. They were big and juicy!

fruit_2017_003_full_width.jpg

We sold and ate a good many but they were ripening faster than we could keep up. When we planned our mini-orchard we chose early, middle, and late season varieties to spread the harvest over a longer period of time. The season started with the Gravensteins which we were able to handle; now Honey Crisp and Liberty are ready to pick, and Jonagold and Winesap are still to come! Without the help of my partner Tom and my handcranked kitchen appliances, I’d still be peeling apples.

squeezo_008_full_width.jpg

Hand Crank Apple Peeler

We made apple pie filling using the handcranked peeler to speed things up. This simple machine draws children (and even grown men) as soon as it is set up. There is something fascinating about turning a handle and having all the work of peeling, coring, and slicing done right before your eyes.

Foley Food Mill

We also made applesauce from the apples that were too misshapen to work in the peeler. For small batches, I usually use the Foley food mill.

squeezo_007_full_width.jpg

 

Squeezo Strainer

This weekend, however, we brought out the big guns—putting the Squeezo strainer to work. I was given this glorious piece of machinery by my sister-in-law when she gave up her big garden and went back to work full time. Since we grow organically and use no spray, I cooked the apples skins and all—it makes for a pretty pink sauce—and sent it through the Squeezo which spits the peels and seeds out one end while the yummy strained sauce comes out the side chute.

squeezo_010_full_width.jpg

It worked so well I tried making pear sauce too. The pears have been plentiful this year as well as the apples. Our trees were planted in 2009 and this is the first really big harvest we have gotten from them.

pears-1747893_1920_full_width.jpg

The Bartletts, my favorites, are an early variety. If I were a perfume designer I would create a swoon-worthy scent from ripe Bartlett pears. Since they are not great keepers we made pear sauce. It came out a little watery so I had to cook it down a bit. That concentrated the pear flavor even more making it dee-lish!

Since the Squeezo was all set up, we put a load of tomatoes through it too. Just wash them, cut out the bad parts, and throw the chunks in the hopper. It doesn’t get much easier than that! Following my sister-in law’s lazy way to make tomato paste, I poured the strained tomato sauce into a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl, put it in the fridge for the night, and in the morning had thick tomato paste. No cooking necessary!

squeezo_003_full_width.jpg

As I said, I am a lazy cook and I have my share of labor-saving devices but these simple handcranked machines are huge time-savers this time of year and no electricity is required. 

See the best apples for apple pies, applesauce, and baking.

About This Blog

Get inspired by Robin Sweetser's backyard gardening tips. Robin has been a contributor to The Old Farmer's Almanac and the All-Seasons Garden Guide for many years. She and her partner Tom have a small greenhouse business and also sell plants, cut flowers, and vegetables at their local Farmer's Market.

Reader Comments

Leave a Comment

Squeezo strainer

My better half hooked my squeezo strainer to his drill gun and we did 25 lbs of raw halved tomatoes in 10 minutes. However the cleanup continues......

Where there’s a drill, there

Where there’s a drill, there’s a way! How clever!

Apple peeler/corer

I put off buying one of these for years. I was thinking the old adage too good to be true. Finally hubby bought me one for Christmas. WOW, made the job so much easier. Then because it was a "tool" hubby started prepping all the apples while I rolled out the crust. We make over 40 pies and put them in the freezer.

Apple Peeler

It works if you have perfect fruit, which I seldom have. I gave mine away and went back to my ceramic paring knife. I love the squeezeo though which I use for tomatoes, applesauce and anything else I can make a sauce from. My favorite kitchen appliance is my 1993 Vitamix however it is not hand powered

Hand powered gadets

I have all three and wouldn't be without any of them. What time savers! They are so cool that everyone wants to lend a hand saving even more time!

Keep Your New Garden Growing

keepgardengrowingcover.jpgTop 10 Veggies.
Almanac Editors Tips- water, feed, pest control, harvest
 

 

You will also be subscribed to our Almanac Companion Newsletter

solar_array.jpg

Solar Energy Production Today

0.00 kWh

Live data from the solar array at The Old Farmer's Almanac offices in Dublin, NH.