Planting Calendar for Deer Park, TX

For the Almanac's fall and spring planting calendars, we've calculated the best time to start seeds indoors, when to transplant young plants outside, and when to direct seed into the ground.

Planting Dates for Fall

On average, your first fall frost occurs on December 10 (at HOUSTON-PORT, TX climate station).
Crop Based on Frost Dates
Start Seeds Indoors by...Plant Seedlings Outdoors by...Start Seeds Outdoors by...
Celery Jun 18 Aug 27N/A
Bell Peppers Jun 27 Aug 22N/A
Eggplants Jun 27 Aug 22N/A
Tomatoes Jul 2 Aug 27N/A
Cauliflower Aug 29 Sep 26N/A
RadishesN/AN/A Nov 5
Kale Sep 18 Oct 16N/A
Brussels Sprouts Aug 19 Sep 16N/A
Cabbage Aug 19 Sep 16N/A
Broccoli Aug 29 Sep 26N/A
PeasN/AN/A Oct 6
SpinachN/AN/A Nov 15
Swiss ChardN/AN/A Oct 31
LettuceN/AN/A Oct 31
CarrotsN/AN/A Oct 21
WatermelonsN/AN/A Aug 12
Summer Squash (Zucchini)N/AN/A Sep 11
TurnipsN/AN/A Oct 31
CucumbersN/AN/A Sep 6
CantaloupesN/AN/A Aug 12
ParsnipsN/AN/A Sep 6
PumpkinsN/AN/A Jul 23
BeetsN/AN/A Oct 26
PotatoesN/AN/A Sep 26
CornN/AN/A Sep 1
Green BeansN/AN/A Sep 6
OkraN/AN/A Sep 1

Planting Dates for Spring

On average, your last spring frost occurs on March 1 (at HOUSTON-PORT, TX climate station).
Crop Based on Frost Dates   Based on Moon Dates
Start Seeds IndoorsPlant Seedlings
or Transplants
Start Seeds Outdoors
Thyme Dec 22-Jan 19
Dec 26-Jan 10
Mar 1-22
Mar 1- 9
N/A
Rosemary Dec 22-Jan 5
Dec 26-Jan 5
Mar 8-29
Mar 8- 9, Mar 24-29
N/A
Celery Dec 22-Jan 5
Dec 26-Jan 5
Mar 8-22
Mar 8- 9
N/A
Eggplants Dec 22-Jan 5
Dec 26-Jan 5
Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29
N/A
Oregano Dec 22-Jan 19
Dec 26-Jan 10
Mar 1-22
Mar 1- 9
N/A
Bell Peppers Dec 22-Jan 5
Dec 26-Jan 5
Mar 8-22
Mar 8- 9
N/A
Sage Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Mar 1-15
Mar 1- 9
N/A
Kale Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Feb 2-23
Feb 2- 9, Feb 23
N/A
RadishesN/AN/A Jan 5-26
Jan 11-23
Cauliflower Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Feb 2-23
Feb 2- 9, Feb 23
N/A
Broccoli Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Feb 2-23
Feb 2- 9, Feb 23
N/A
Tomatoes Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Mar 8-29
Mar 8- 9, Mar 24-29
N/A
Brussels Sprouts Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Feb 2-16
Feb 2- 9
N/A
Cabbage Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Feb 2-16
Feb 2- 9
N/A
Basil Jan 5-19
Jan 5-10
Mar 1-22
Mar 1- 9
N/A
Swiss Chard Jan 19-Feb 2
Jan 24-Feb 2
Feb 9-16
Feb 9
N/A
SpinachN/AN/A Jan 19-Feb 9
Jan 24-Feb 9
PeasN/AN/A Jan 19-Feb 9
Jan 24-Feb 9
Lettuce Jan 19-Feb 2
Jan 24-Feb 2
Feb 16-Mar 15
Feb 23-Mar 9
N/A
CarrotsN/AN/A Jan 26-Feb 9
DillN/AN/A Jan 26-Feb 9
Jan 26-Feb 9
Cucumbers Feb 2- 9
Feb 2- 9
Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29
N/A
TurnipsN/AN/A Feb 2-23
Feb 10-22
Summer Squash (Zucchini) Feb 2-16
Feb 2- 9
Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29
N/A
Cantaloupes Feb 2- 9
Feb 2- 9
Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29
N/A
Sweet Potatoes Feb 2- 9
Mar 15-29
Mar 15-23
N/A
ParsleyN/AN/A Feb 2-16
Feb 2- 9
OnionsN/AN/A Feb 2-23
Feb 10-22
ChivesN/AN/A Feb 2- 9
Feb 2- 9
Watermelons Feb 2- 9
Feb 2- 9
Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29
N/A
Pumpkins Feb 9-23
Feb 9
Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29
N/A
ParsnipsN/AN/A Feb 9-Mar 1
Feb 10-22
BeetsN/AN/A Feb 16-Mar 8
Feb 16-22
PotatoesN/AN/A Feb 23-Mar 15
Mar 10-15
CornN/AN/A Mar 1-15
Mar 1- 9
Cilantro (Coriander)N/AN/A Mar 1-15
Mar 1- 9
Green BeansN/AN/A Mar 8-29
Mar 8- 9, Mar 24-29
OkraN/AN/A Mar 15-29
Mar 24-29

How to Use the Planting Calendar

This planting calendar is a guide that tells you the best time to start planting your garden, based on frost dates. Our planting calendar is customized to your location in order to give you the most accurate information possible. Please note:

  • The Frost Dates indicate the best planting dates based on your local average frost dates. Average frost dates are based on historical weather data and are the planting guideline used by most gardeners. Although frost dates are a good way to know approximately when to start gardening, always check a local forecast before planting outdoors!
  • The Plant Seedlings or Transplants dates indicate the best time to plant young plants outdoors. This includes plants grown from seed indoors at home and small starter plants bought from a nursery.
  • When no dates ("N/A") appear in the chart, that starting method is typically not recommended for that particular plant, although it likely still possible. See each plant's individual Growing Guide for more specific information. 
  • The Moon Dates indicate the best planting dates based on your local frost dates and Moon phases. Planting by the Moon is considered a more traditional technique. We use Moon-favorable dates at the very start of the gardening season. It's a little complex for a fall planting.

To plan your garden more accurately in the future, keep a record of your garden's conditions each year, including frost dates and seed-starting dates!

Frequently Asked Questions

Why Do You Start Seeds Indoors?

In the spring, starting seeds indoors (in seed trays or starter pots) gives your crops a head start on the growing season, which is especially important in regions with a short growing season. Starting seeds indoors also provides plants with a chance to grow in a stable, controlled environment. Outdoors, the unpredictability of rain, drought, frost, low and high temperatures, sunlight, and pests and diseases can take a toll on young plants, especially when they're just getting started. Indoors, you can control these elements to maximize your plants' early growth and give them the best shot at thriving when they are eventually transplanted outdoors. 

For most crops, you should start seeds indoors about 6-8 weeks before your last spring frost date. This gives the plants plenty of time to grow large and healthy enough to survive their eventual transplanting to the garden.

Read more about starting seeds indoors here

How Is Planting for a Fall Harvest Different? 

Planting in late summer for a fall harvest has many benefits (soil is already warm, temperatures are cooler, fewer pests). However, the challenge is getting your crops harvested before the winter frosts begin. When we calculate fall planting dates (which are really in the summer), we must account for several factors, such as the time to harvest once the crop is mature and whether a crop is tender or hardy when it comes to frost. The "days to maturity" of a crop and the length of your growing season also factor into whether you start seeds early indoors or directly sow seeds into the ground outside. Note:

  • Warm-weather veggies like beans, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, cantaloupe, and watermelons are all sown directly into the ground.
  • Tender heat-loving plants such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants take a long time to mature and have a lengthy harvesting period, so we generally don't plant a second round of these crops for fall, as they won't ripen in time. (In regions with mild winters, this may not be the case.) These crops are typically started indoors early in the season and transplanted.
  • Root vegetables (beets, carrots) do not transplant well, so start seeds directly in the soil outside.
  • Peas are also best seeded into the ground; do not transplant.
  • Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and cabbage could be direct seeded, but because of the heat of mid- and late summer, it's better to start them indoors and then transplant them into the garden.
  • We tend to direct-sow leafy greens such as lettuce, chard, and spinach, though some gardeners will also sow indoors. It depends on your climate.
  • Note that garlic is not included in our planting chart. It's a popular fall crop, but the dates vary wildly based on location and it's really best to gauge garlic planting dates with a soil thermometer. When the soil temperature is 60°F (15.6°C) at a depth of 4 inches, then plant your garlic. We'd advise checking our Garlic Growing Guide for more information. 

Read more about the "Best Vegetables to Plant in the Fall."

When Should You Transplant Seedlings?

When seedlings have grown too large for their seed trays or starter pots, it's time to transplant. If it's not yet warm enough to plant outdoors, transplant the seedlings to larger plastic or peat pots indoors and continue care. If outdoor conditions allow, start hardening off your seedlings approximately one week before your last frost date, then transplant them into the garden. Get more tips for transplanting seedlings.

What Is Planting by the Moon?

Planting by the Moon (also called "Gardening by the Moon") is a traditional way to plant your above- and below-ground crops, especially at the start of the season. Here's how it works:

  • Plant annual flowers and vegetables that bear crops above ground during the light, or waxing, of the Moon. In other words, plant from the day the Moon is new until the day it is full.
  • Plant flowering bulbs, biennial and perennial flowers, and vegetables that bear crops below ground during the dark, or waning, of the Moon. In other words, plant from the day after the Moon is full until the day before it is new again.

Old-time farmers swear that this practice results in a larger, tastier harvest, so we've included planting by the Moon dates in our planting calendar, too. Learn more about Planting and Gardening by the Moon.