El Nino to the Rescue?

October 13, 2016
Where Tropical Storms Form
NOAA

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For the first time on record, both the Atlantic and the East Pacific have had tropical storms form before the opening of hurricane season.

In the Pacific, Tropical Storm Aletta began swirling four hours before the official opening of the East Pacific Hurricane Season on May 15. In the Atlantic, Tropical Storm Alberto started the Atlantic Hurricane Season 13 days before the official June 1 beginning.

Does this mean we will have long and active hurricane seasons? It all depends on El Niño. If El Niño develops in the Pacific, it will put a break to the storm development in the Atlantic. It won’t stop the weather disturbances altogether, but it will stop most from growing large enough to become tropical storms and hurricanes.

Remember—the recipe for a tropical storm is:

  1. Take a normal rainstorm and combine it with an ocean.
  1. Simmer gently over warm water  (+80˚F)
  1. Stir with favorable winds.

Where Atlantic tropical storms usually form in June. SOURCE: NOAA

Thanks to the fast flowing Gulf Stream, we have some very hot waters in the Gulf of Mexico and off the East Coast. These are the areas where early season hurricanes start. Now, we even have favorable winds over these regions. Tropical Storm Alberto developed last week and scientists are watching waters off the Florida coast for another possible storm.

That’s where an El Niño changes the situation. The El Niño is a huge weather phenomenon. Over a million square miles of the Tropical Pacific change temperatures. The warmer water heats the air above it, which changes air pressure. That changes winds, especially tropical winds. Since the phenomenon is so huge, it changes tropical winds all around the globe.

In the Atlantic, the high altitude winds tend to be strong and sheering. As a storm grows, the high winds sheer the top off, keeping it from growing into a hurricane. There always are some hurricanes in El Niño years, but usually a lower number.

The warm waters of the El Niño shape tropical high and low level winds and weather.

SOURCE: CPC/NOAA

This year, we are seeing early tropical storm development in the Atlantic. We probably will even see an active hurricane season in the early part of the year, as storm after storm simmers over the warm Atlantic. Then if the models are right, El Niño will develop sometime in late summer or early autumn and rescue us.

It’s shaping up to be a story tale season. The damsels in distress—Georgia, Florida and the Carolinas—will be threatened by monstrous tropical storms. Then El Niño charges in on a white horse and quells the monsters by chopping off their tops. Happy ending!

About This Blog

Are you a weather watcher? Welcome to “Weather Whispers” by James Garriss and until recently, Evelyn Browning Garriss. With expertise and humor, this column covers everything weather—from weather forecasts to WHY extreme weather happens to ways that weather affects your life from farming to your grocery bill. Enjoy weather facts, folklore, and fun!

With heavy hearts, we share the news that historical climatologist and immensely entertaining Almanac contributor Evelyn Browning Garriss passed away in late June 2017. Evelyn shared her lifetime of weather knowledge with Almanac editors and readers, explaining weather phenomena in conversation and expounding on topics in articles for the print edition of The Old Farmer’s Almanac as well as in these articles. We were honored to know and work with her as her time allowed, which is to say when she was not giving lectures to, writing articles for, and consulting with scientists, academia, investors, and government agencies around the world. She will be greatly missed by the Almanac staff and readers.

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