October 2020 Forecast: Not-So-Scary Halloween Weather

Halloween Will Be a Treat This Year!

October 29, 2020
Halloween Forecast
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Find out if Halloween weather will bring a trick or treat this year. Here’s our October 2020 weather forecast from Michael Steinberg, Old Farmer’s Almanac meteorologist.

October 2020 Predictions

October starts out beautifully for most of the country with sunshine predicted for the western half of North America, cloudiness in the middle of the continent, and a lot of rainy periods for cities down the Eastern seaboard.  

On October 12, Canadian Thanksgiving, folks in Canada and give thanks for umbrellas, as showers and cool temperatures will predominate across the Commonwealth. In the States, a tropical rainstorm will dampen the Northeast, while most other parts of the nation will have dry weather.

The weather on October 17, National Pasta Day, will not bring a chance of meatballs, but rain will grate on some in the northwest quarter of the United States and eastern third of Canada.

On October 20, World Statistics Day, there’s a 63.2% chance of a tropical storm threat in the southeastern states, with a 71.3% chance of snow showers in the Intermountain region and Alaska and an 81.2% chance of rain in the Pacific states. The chances for rain are only 12.7% elsewhere, although 78.2% of Canada will have at least the possibility of a shower. The Prairies will even have a 40.7% chance of snow.

Halloween Will Be a Treat

October 31 brings Halloween, the only day of the year in which I look normal. The weather will be a treat across most of the United States.

While the weather leading up to Halloween may bring storms, the Saturday of Halloween should be dry and quiet for most of the United States. That said, it will be brisk and cold, as is normal this time of year. It will especially be cold in northern regions, though not as bitterly cold as earlier in the week. Bring a coat as temperatures will drop in the evenings. In fact, expect dry but brisk temperatures in much of the country (except for the Southwest). 

While most of the country will be dry, there may be some showers in South Florida and along the Southeast coast. A few snow and rain showers could fall in far northern Minnesota and Wisconsin.

In Canada, the Prairies should be dry, but most of Canada will have trickier weather, with showers across the south and snowy periods farther north.

A Halloween Blue Moon

The other exciting news about Halloween is clear skies for a rare full Moon! Areas of high pressure should work together to keep clouds and rain from forming for a beautiful night sky lit up by the Moon’s glow. The Halloween full Moon is also known as a “blue” Moon because it’s the second full Moon of the month.  Find out more about the Halloween Blue Moon!

The Upcoming Winter

As for the upcoming winter, we will be entering Solar Cycle 25, which is expected to bring very low solar activity. Although low levels of solar activity have historically been associated with cooler temperatures, on average, across Earth, we believe that recent warming trends will dominate in the eastern and northern parts of the United States in the coming winter, with below-normal average temperatures limited to the western portion of the nation.

Temperatures will average above normal in most of Canada, except for Atlantic Canada and the Prairies, where below-normal readings are expected. As we move toward the winter, watch for any changes in the ENSO pattern (the El Niño–Southern Oscillation, which is based on temperatures in the Pacific Ocean), where we expect a weak La Niña to develop. If La Niña were to be stronger, colder temperatures would likely prevail across the northern Plains and southern Ontario. If instead we have more neutral conditions or an El Niño, California would experience heavier rainfall while the Canadian Prairies would have milder temperatures.

See the 2020–2021 Winter Weather Forecast from The Old Farmer’s Almanac.

About This Blog

Mike Steinberg is Senior Vice President for Special Initiatives at AccuWeather Inc in State College, Pennsylvania. He is also a member of the National Weather Association and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society.

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