2019-2020 Long Range Weather Forecast for Victoria, BC

Get the Long Range Weather for Your Location

See long range weather forecasts for the next 60 days from The Old Farmer’s Almanac! Our long range forecasts can be used to make more informed decisions about future plans that depend on the weather, from vacations and weddings to sporting events and outdoor activities.

To see long term forecasts for the entire year, pick up a copy of The 2020 Old Farmer’s Almanac, available online and in stores.

Note: Long range forecasts are regional, not city-specific.

Free 2-Month Weather Forecast

November 2019 Long Range Weather Forecast for Southern British Columbia
DatesWeather Conditions
Nov 1-10Rain, then sunny, cool
Nov 11-18Rainy periods, mild south; snow, turning cold north
Nov 19-24Sunny, mild
Nov 25-30Rainy periods, mild
Novembertemperature 6°C (1°C above avg.)
precipitation 165mm (30mm above avg. east, avg. west)

December 2019 Long Range Weather Forecast for Southern British Columbia
DatesWeather Conditions
Dec 1-5Rainy, mild
Dec 6-15Rain south, snow north; mild
Dec 16-26Showers coast, flurries inland; cold, then mild
Dec 27-31Heavy rain to snow
Decembertemperature 5°C (3°C above avg.)
precipitation 190mm (40mm above avg.)

Annual Weather Summary
November 2019 to October 2020

Winter will be colder than normal, with above-normal precipitation and below-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be in mid-December and early January, from late January into early February, and in mid- and late February, with the snowiest periods in late December, early to mid-January, and early February. April and May will be slightly warmer than normal, with precipitation above normal in the north and below normal in the south. Summer will be hotter than normal, with the hottest periods in late June and mid-July. Precipitation will be above normal. September and October will be warmer than normal, with near-normal precipitation in the east and above-normal precipitation elsewhere.

Map showing Old Farmer's Almanac long range weather region number 5

About the Southern British Columbia Region

The Southern British Columbia long range weather region includes all or part of the following provinces: BRITISH COLUMBIA (Abbotsford, Campbell River, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, Parksville, Penticton, Port Alberni, Powell River, Quesnel, Salmon Arm, Squamish, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria, White Rock, Williams Lake).

Southern British Columbia Neighboring Regions

Here are the regions that neighbor the Southern British Columbia long range weather region:

Temperature and Precipitation November 2019 to October 2020

Temperature and Precipitation Chart, November 2019 to October 2020 for Victoria, BC

Reader Comments

Leave a Comment

warm winter

I agree, been a warm almost snowless winter

Winter?

Can you please explain to me how October is defined as winter? Actually, that's just a rhetorical question. Come on folks, winter don't start till November!

BC Forecast

Your telling lies,their forecasts are wrong in every way for example, they said it was going to be cold on January 1-5 while it e
was freaking 8 degrees! I used to trust them but their forecasts are just plain stupid and the fact that you trust them is mind-boggling.

Bc forcast

Andrew get off the crack they have been spot on !!

BC Forecast

Well if they’re spot on than why did it snow 2 FEET in February when the predictions said it was going to rain? Just face it, the almanac is just dumb and they don’t look at the current forecast.

Southern BC forecast

so we have May starting with weeks of 20C plus weather and night temps around 10C plus with sunny skies as far as the eye can see.
And the Almanac has rain and cold....

The winter weather report for B.C 2019

Your weather forecast is bogus, we are having warm temperatures and there is no snow to be seen. You say that it would be cold in January but instead we are warm. You really should update your weather forecasts regularly so it’s actually right but since I haven’t seen the rest of January I might be wrong but since I trust the weather network more I believe you are wrong and it will not be cold in January because there is no arctic flow so no snow. Please upgrade your weather every week at least so it is right.

Sincerely, Andrew
January 8 2019

updating weather

This is based from a book that is printed and issued the year prior taken from weather patterns from the last 30 years or something. They are not a weather station providing super accurate and up to date forecasts. If you want weather forecasts that are based on "now" and whats really happening, I suggest the weather channel, or weather network. Farmers almanac is based on prediction, its a guess, it's not 100%.

darylshim@gmail.com

Feb 7, 2019

It has been very cold for the month of Feb . - 1° , not too bad during the
day but really cold at night.

We had a mild Dec - Jan and that was nice , kind of cool .

I sure hope it warms up next month
I live in Vancouver , BC .
We hardly had any snow this year compared nearly 2 years ago .

Reappearance of smoke

After a almost whole summer of intense smoke in mid-southern B.C. (Boundary Area), we were treated again to the stink of forest burning last night. But this time the culprit is not a careless smoker or camper, or a lightning storm. It is our dear Forestry department, who must feel that we haven't had enough smoke already, or that we need to keep in shape for another smokey summer in 2019, or perhaps those who made the decision don't live in an area that spent the summer immersed in the blue haze. Where the carbon-reducing considerations in burning slash are, I know not, just that breathing in Sunday night's smoke brought back the memory of what a terrible summer that we had to live through, with fires in the Snowy Mountains, and Manning Park allowed to burn on with little attempt to stop them. I know a considerable amount of the smoke came from California, but the wind pattern doesn't always come from south to north. Maybe this behavior of the Forestry is good for the timber companies, but myself, and others, who have COPD or asthma, may have to sell our properties and move somewhere where we can breathe year around. I wonder what the losses in tourism are, when people avoid coming to the province because of the blue fog. I wonder if we are losing more in tourism dollars than what we are spending in fighting fires? There needs to be a discussion, as to the wisdom of letting fires burn on without much intervention, that include B.C. residents who have to bear the brunt of the blue B.C. air, and another discussion on the wisdom of slash burning in spring and fall. Enough already!

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