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Winter Weather Forecast for 2021-2022 | Almanac.com

2021–2022 Winter Weather Forecast

Presenting the winter predictions from The 2022 Old Farmer’s Almanac!

Almanac CoverThe 2022 Old Farmer’s Almanac is now available! Pick up a copy of North America’s #1 Almanac and oldest continuously published periodical in stores across the United States and Canada.

Every year, the first questions that folks ask us are “Will this winter be a cold one?” and “When will it snow?” Courtesy of the new 2022 edition, here are highlights from our annual winter weather predictions!

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“A Season of Shivers” Predicted for the U.S.

Winter Weather Map US

Brrr! The 2022 Old Farmer’s Almanac comes with a winter warning: Prepare for a “Season of Shivers.” This winter will be punctuated by positively bone-chilling, below-average temperatures across most of the United States.

“This coming winter could well be one of the longest and coldest that we’ve seen in years,” says Janice Stillman, editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac. For 230 years, the Almanac has been helping readers to prepare for winter’s worst with its 80 percent–accurate weather forecasts.

In some places, the super cold of the coming winter will also bring lots of snow. This extreme wintry mix is expected in areas of New England as well as throughout the Ohio Valley, in northern portions of the Deep South, and in southeast New Mexico.

Above-average snowfall is also in the forecast along a track from eastern Montana southward through the western halves of the Dakotas and into northeastern Colorado. While temperatures in this midcountry strip will be relatively normal, snowfall will be abundant, with several storms predicted throughout the winter.

Meanwhile, most western areas will remain relatively dry, with all but the Pacific Coast itself and portions of the Southwest experiencing the frigid cold predicted for much of the rest of the country.

Pick up a copy of the new 2022 edition for a year of forecasts!

Get Ready to “Weather the Storms” Across Canada

Winter Weather Map CA

Canadians should be prepared to “Weather the Storms,” as winter will be punctuated by a series of storms leaving them snowed in, sleeted on, slushed about, soaked, and otherwise generally soggy.

“This coming winter won’t be remarkable in terms of temperature, but for our Canadian friends who will end up just wanting to dry out, it will be a long season indeed,” says Editor Janice Stillman. Whether snow, sleet, or rain arrives will depend on location, location, location!

Snowfall will be above normal from western Atlantic Canada and eastern Quebec out through northern Ontario and the northern Prairies and into Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, and the Yukon. A series of back-to-back storms from mid-December to late January could leave Atlantic Canada snowed under for several weeks. 

With slightly above-average temperatures throughout the season in all but the northernmost portions of the Prairies, winter storm clouds may sometimes bring rain or freezing rain across the nation’s midsection. However, this doesn’t mean that snow is completely out of the forecast: Major snowstorms are predicted for the Prairies in late November, mid-January, and early March.

This winter’s white-and-wet forecast will see colder-than-average temperatures from western Quebec into southern Ontario. While storms throughout the season are expected to bring plenty of rain, freezing rain, sleet, and flurries, snowfall itself will be below average overall.

The only place in Canada that won’t have many storms to weather is British Columbia, which should expect below-average precipitation and above-average temperatures throughout the season.

Order The 2022 Old Farmer’s Almanac Canadian Edition for a year of forecasts!

Find more regional forecasts for Canada and the U.S. below—and learn more about what’s inside The 2022 Old Farmer’s Almanac!

Order Your 2022 Almanac Here

How Does the Almanac Predict the Weather

By tradition, The Old Farmer’s Almanac employs three scientific disciplines to make long-range predictions: solar science, the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, the study of prevailing weather patterns; and meteorology, the study of the atmosphere. We predict weather trends and events by comparing solar patterns and historical weather conditions with current solar activity.

Our forecasts emphasize temperature and precipitation deviations from averages, or normals. These are based on 30-year statistical averages prepared by government meteorological agencies. Read more about how we predict the weather and see how accurate we were last winter.

For the 2021–2022 weather predictions, the important factors which shape the weather include a weak La Niña, a continued warm phase in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), a neutral to positive phase in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the early stages of its warm cycle. In addition, we are in the early stages of Solar Cycle 25, which is expected to bring very low solar activity—historically associated with cooler temperatures, on average, across Earth.

2022 Almanac

What’s Inside The 2022 Almanac?

In addition to its much-anticipated weather forecasts, The Old Farmer’s Almanac is known for being “useful, with a pleasant degree of humor.” Highlights from the 2022 Almanac include …

  • Gardening tips for growing a rainbow of dahlias or a patch of pumpkins (hint: the bumpier the skin, the sweeter the taste!), plus how to make scents of potpourri. 
  • Recipes that make the most of the season, along with award-winning dishes and desserts that use five or fewer ingredients!
  • Dispatches from small farmers, including how they fared during 2020 and continue to diversify for the future.
  • The art and science of animal tracking, plus how to read Mother Nature’s signs to choose a fishing spot.

All this awaits in the 2022 Almanac, along with stories about gargantuan hail (is it becoming more common?); the 50th anniversary of an epic international sports showdown; an examination of teeth, from cradle to grave; the 17-year-old design genius behind the 50-star American flag (U.S. edition only); unique tourist locations that let visitors get up close to saints, war heroes, and even Roy Rogers’ horse; 2022 home and lifestyle trends; and so much more! 

Plus, your new 2022 edition includes everything that you expect and look forward to from the Almanac—monthly calendars sprinkled with wit and wisdom, astronomical timetables, planting guides, and bits of valuable advice that continue The Old Farmer’s Almanac’s time-honored traditions.

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The Old Farmer’s Almanac Is North America’s Original Almanac!

There are other books out there that call themselves a “farmer’s almanac.” The Old Farmer’s Almanac—with its familiar yellow cover—is the original and #1 across the United States and Canada.

  • The 2022 Old Farmer’s Almanac is now available EVERYWHERE that books and magazines are sold, including grocery, hardware, and home stores. We encourage readers to support independent booksellers and retailers whenever possible. See our list of stores in your zip or postal code.
  • Or, those who’d prefer to have a copy of the new 2022 edition delivered straight to their door can order online from AMAZON.com as well as find exclusive Almanac editions and special collections in our Almanac store.

The Almanac costs only $7.99 but lasts the entire year and always brings a smile. (Yes, good things DO come in small packages.) 

As always, we hope that you find the 2022 edition “useful with a pleasant degree of humor”!

The 2022 Almanac

Northeast (Region 1)

Winter will be colder than normal, on average, with near- to below-normal snowfall. Precipitation will be above normal in the north and below normal in the south. The coldest periods will be in early December, early to mid- and late January, and mid-February, with the snowiest periods in mid- to late December, early January, and early and mid-February.

Atlantic Corridor (Region 2)

Winter temperatures and precipitation will be below normal, on average, with above-normal snowfall in the north and below-normal in the south. The coldest periods will be in early, mid-, and late December; mid-January; and early to mid-February. The snowiest periods will occur in mid- and late December, from early to mid-January, and in mid-March. 

Appalachians (Region 3)

Winter will be colder and drier than normal, with near-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be in early, mid-, and late December; through much of January; and in early and mid-February. The snowiest periods will be in early December, early January, and mid-February. 

Southeast (Region 4)

Winter temperatures will be below normal, on average, with the coldest periods in mid- and late December, throughout much of January, and in early to mid-February. Precipitation will be below normal in the north and above normal in the south. Snowfall will be near normal, with the best chances for snow in mid- to late January and early to mid-February.

Florida (Region 5)

Winter will be cooler than normal, with the coldest temperatures in mid- and late December and mid-January and from late January into early February. Precipitation will be above normal in the north and below normal in the south.

Lower Lakes (Region 6)

Winter will be colder and drier than normal, with the coldest temperatures in mid- to late November, through most of December and January, and in early to mid-February. Snowfall will be near normal in most areas, although a few places south of the Lakes will have much-above-normal snowfall. The snowiest periods will be in late November, mid- and late December, early and mid- to late January, early to mid-February, and mid-March.

Ohio Valley (Region 7)

Winter will be colder than normal, with below-normal precipitation but above-normal snowfall, especially in the west. The coldest periods will occur in mid- to late November and through much of the period from mid-December through January. The snowiest periods will arrive in mid-December, early and mid-January, and mid- to late February.

Deep South (Region 8)

Winter will be colder than normal, on average, with the coldest periods in mid-December, early and mid- to late January, and early to mid-February. Rainfall will be near normal in the north and above normal in the south, with the best threats for snow in the north from late December into early January and in mid- to late January.

Upper Midwest (Region 9)

Winter temperatures will be below normal, on average, with the coldest periods in early, mid-, and late December; early and late January; and mid-February. Precipitation will be above normal in the east and below normal in the west, while snowfall will be below normal in most areas. The snowiest periods will be in late November, mid- to late December, mid- and late January, mid- and late February, and late March.

Heartland (Region 10)

Winter will be colder and drier than normal, on average, with the coldest periods in mid- and late December, early and late January, and early to mid-February. Snowfall will be below normal in the north and above normal in central and southern areas. The snowiest periods will be in late December, early January, and mid-February.

Texas-Oklahoma (Region 11)

Winter will be colder than normal, especially in the south, with the coldest periods in mid- to late November, mid- and late December, and early and late January. Precipitation will be below normal in the north and above normal in the south. Snowfall will be near normal, with the best chances for snow in early and late January, mainly in the north.

High Plains (Region 12)

Winter will be milder than normal, with the coldest periods in mid- to late November, late December, and early and mid- to late January. Precipitation will be near to slightly above normal, with snowfall above normal in the north and below normal in the south. The snowiest periods will be in mid- to late November, late December, early to mid-January, and the last third of March.

Intermountain (Region 13)

Winter will be slightly colder than normal as well as drier, with below-normal snowfall in most areas. The coldest periods will be in late November, late December, and early and late January, with the snowiest periods in late December, late January, and early March.

Desert Southwest (Region 14)

Winter will be colder than normal in the east, with above-normal precipitation, while the west will be slightly warmer and drier than normal. The coldest periods will be in mid- to late November, from late December into early January, and in late February. Snowfall will be above normal in most areas that normally receive snow, with the snowiest periods in late November, early December, and early January.

Pacific Northwest (Region 15)

Winter temperatures will be milder than normal, with below-normal precipitation and snowfall. The coldest periods will occur in early December, from late December into early January, and in mid-January and early March. The snowiest periods will occur in late December and early March.

Pacific Southwest (Region 16)

Winter will be warmer and drier than normal, with below-normal mountain snows. The coldest temperatures will occur from mid-December into mid-January, in mid-February, and in early March. The stormiest period will be in late December.

Alaska (Region 17)

Winter temperatures will be milder than normal, with the coldest periods in mid- to late January, late February, and early March. Precipitation will be near normal N and above normal S. Snowfall will be above normal in all areas but the south, with the snowiest periods in early November and mid- to late January.

Hawaii (Region 18)

Winter temperatures will be warmer than normal, with the coolest periods in mid- to late December and mid- to late March. Rainfall will be below normal, with the stormiest periods in early December, late January, and early March.

Atlantic Canada (Region 1)

Winter temperatures will be above normal in the north and near normal in the south, with the coldest periods in early to mid- and late January and early to mid- and late February. Precipitation will be below normal in the north and above in the south. Snowfall will be below normal in the east and above in the west, with the snowiest periods in early and mid-December, early to mid- and mid- to late January, and mid-March.

Southern Quebec (Region 2)

Winter temperatures will be slightly above normal in the east and below normal in the west, with the coldest periods in early and mid- to late December; early, mid-, and late January; and mid- to late February. Precipitation will be above normal, with snowfall above normal in the east and below normal in the west. The snowiest periods will be in mid-December, early January, and mid-February.

Southern Ontario (Region 3)

Winter will be colder than normal, with above-normal precipitation and below-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be in late November, mid- to late December, and much of January, with the snowiest periods in mid- to late November, early December, and early January.

The Prairies (Region 4)

Winter will have above-normal temperatures and precipitation, with below-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be from late December to early January and in mid- to late January, with the snowiest periods in late November, mid-January, and early March.

Southern British Columbia (Region 5)

Winter will be warmer and drier than normal, with below-normal snowfall. The coldest period will be from late December into early January, with the snowiest periods in late November, late December, and early January. April and May will have near-normal temperatures and be rainier than normal.

Yukon (Region 6)

Winter temperatures, precipitation, and snowfall will be above normal. The coldest periods will be from late November into early December, in late December, early January, and early February, with the snowiest periods in mid-November, early December, and mid- to late January.

Northwest Territories (Region 7)

Winter temperatures and precipitation will be above normal, on average, with generally below-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be from late November into mid-December, in mid- to late January, and in early to mid-March. The snowiest periods will be in mid-November, mid- to late December, late January, and mid- to late March.