Morning Glories

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Botanical name: Ipomoea

Plant type: Flower

Sun exposure: Full Sun

Soil type: Any, Sandy, Loamy

Flower color: Red, Pink, Blue, Purple, White

Bloom time: Summer, Fall

Morning glories are annual climbers with slender stems, heart-shaped leaves, and trumpet-shaped flowers in pink, purple-blue, magenta, or white. They have a beautiful shape before they unfold in the Sun and romantic tendrils that lend old-fashioned charm.

In warmer areas, train climbers over a pergola or arch, or use as dense groundcover. The vine grows quickly up to 15 feet in one season, and can self-seed fairly easily, too.

The flowers bloom from early summer to the first frost. Their big, fragrant, colorful flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

Note that the seeds are highly toxic if ingested.

Planting

  • Grow annuals in a sunny, sheltered site. They need a lot of sun.
  • Plant in moderately fertile, well-drained soil.
  • Choose a site that is sheltered from cold or drying winds.
  • Sow Morning Glory seeds early in the season once the ground has warmed to 64 degrees F.
  • File the seeds just long enough to break the coat and soak them for 24 hours before planting them. (They look like little worms.)
  • Cover lightly with 1/4-inch of soil. Space about 6 inches apart. Water thoroughly.

Care

  • Apply a balanced liquid fertilizer after planting and monthly.
  • Support climbers and trailing species.
  • Morning glories are low-maintenance. Water during dry periods.
  • Mulch to retain moisture and avoid weeds.

Pests

  • White blister, rust, fungal leaf spots, stem rot, thread blight, charcoal rot, and wild occur.
  • Deer can be a nuisance.

Recommended Varieties

  • 'Heavenly Blue' are the classic morning glories with the rich azure (blue) flowers with white throats. It climbs to 12 feet.
  • 'Scarlett O'Hara' has bright red flowers with a white throat. It climbs to 15 feet.

Photo credit: Audrey Lucas

Special Features

  • Attracts Butterflies
  • Attracts Birds

Comments

i live in cambridge in the uk

By gordon lindsay

i live in cambridge in the uk i tried to grow morning glory last year uk thay never grew i have planted some more this year at the moment thay are just showing what care should i take of them thanks

so i just ate about 200 seeds

By brib

so i just ate about 200 seeds ground up because i heard that it improves memory and relieves back pain. was this a good idea?

Morning glory seeds contain

By Jackie1234 on April 8

Morning glory seeds contain Lysergic acid amide, a hallucinogen similar to LSD, but with 1/10th the power. Many states in the US have created ways to monitor bulk purchases of the seeds and to screen teenage purchasers for intent to ingest.

Have a good trip!

By lolukeyeah on March 23

Have a good trip!

No, it's not a good idea.

By georgewilson

No, it's not a good idea. Their are several potential dangers of ingesting the seeds.

I loved growing these in

By Jessy

I loved growing these in California where they kept blooming and growing all winter. Now I'm in Denver, CO now. If I grow them in a large container, can I keep them alive and growing over winter?

If you're speaking of the

By Almanac Staff

If you're speaking of the morning glory that is an annual, it will not overwinter. In the spring, when the soil is warm, turn the soil, water, it well, and seed again.

Can you grow Morning Glory in

By Charles34

Can you grow Morning Glory in Los Angeles CA?

My morning glories bloom and

By Kevin Tossie

My morning glories bloom and then the flower dies the next day! What can I do to prevent this?

This is the nature of a

By Almanac Staff

This is the nature of a morning glory!  Nothing is wrong. Each flower will bloom in the morning and close by noon or so. Each flower only opens once, but there will be others the next day!

When I was young (in the

By Ty Hardister

When I was young (in the 1950s & 60s) we had some wild morning glories growing on a wire fence beside our yard. They were multicolored with blue, pink, yellow and white growing, seemingly, on the same vine. Is this possible and if so where could I find some seeds?

Hmm. We aren't aware of a

By Almanac Staff

Hmm. We aren't aware of a native morning glory that is multicolored. We have heard of cultivated varieties that come in several colors in a series. Also, blue flowers sometimes fade to purple, pink, or white as they age. Could the plant from your yard back then have been an escaped cultivated variety, and could it be that several vines were intertwined?
 
If you're interested in multicolored morning glories, you might check seed catalogs for the Ipomoea variety mixes or series, such as from Burpee.
 
There is also a dwarf morning glory, which is Convolvulus tricolor. It is related to Ipomoea, but is a dwarf vine, growing only about 12 to 18 inches. Its flowers have a yellow center, white around that center, and then blue, purple, or pink at the edges of the petals. These are a little harder to find, but a search online will give you a few seed sources. Be sure to get a series, rather than one cultivar (which may be just one color of petal at the edge).

Are you to cut them back

By Joni Blymire

Are you to cut them back after first frost or just leave them .they look all dryed up .this is my first time .i hope they come back their so pretty .thanks

Morning glories don't

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories don't tolerate frost. They are annuals (i.e., they only grow one season) and should be discarded once frost hits. You can plant again in the spring once you're past all danger of frost.

We have recently bought a

By CheriH

We have recently bought a house and on one side the front porch there is a BEAUTIFUL vine of morning glories, the problem is it is twined around a tree that my husband is going to cut down, I want to transplant the morning glory to the back yard to cover the fence for our gas tank. I have never had morning glories before and I don't want to loose them in the transplant, what do I do to transplant them, and when should I do it. My husband wants to cut the tree down ASAP. We live in NC

Many morning glories of the

By Almanac Staff

Many morning glories of the genus Ipomoea that are found in garden centers are annuals, so after a frost or two, they will die. For NC, it looks like your first average fall frost date is in October or November, depending on where you are. If you want to save the morning glories for now, you can certainly try to transplant them gently into their new location, and they might last until the frost hits. Their roots usually don't like disturbance, so handle very gently--keep a lot of original soil around the roots. In the new location, make sure there is plenty of sun; add some compost to the planting hole. Keep the soil moist in the new location, but not soggy, for the first week or so.
 
Or, if you allow some of the flowers to form seeds, you can collect them and plant them next year at the new location.
 
If you think that your vine is a perennial type, the same advice would still apply, as far as transplanting and site preparation.
 
 

we have already had our first

By CheriH

we have already had our first frost is it to late to transplant them? can I just clip some of the vines and transplant or do I need to transplant at the roots? or should I try to save some of the seeds?

do they self seed if grown

By jodie kay

do they self seed if grown indoors

Morning glories need very

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories need very bright light to even bloom indoors. If you succeed in growing them indoors than yes, they'll seed.

my husband started growing

By sylvia anne allen

my husband started growing morning glories this summer and has done awesome with them now we see all the seed pods on them how and when can we take the seed pods from them to keep the seeds ready for spring!!

Morning glories are a great

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories are a great seed to save--easy to identify and gather. After the seed pods have fully dried to brown, collect the seeds on a dry, sunny day. Let them dry and store in a sealed container until spring!

This my 1st yr growin ne

By Tanya shidler

This my 1st yr growin ne thing i grew mgs & they went crazy. i planted 4. they took awhile to bloom but once they did they bloom like crazy. they're beautiful. i didnt fertilize or water all summer. i was so tickled as this is my 1st yr growing anything. i grew aster marigolds sunflowers(which my mgs choked to death) nasturtiums and a couple others that grew. i had about 5 i grew that never came up but i feel successful just because of the mgs alone. this is a great flower for a beginner because it doesn't require much care. i had 2 white ones & a bright pink 1 and purple 1 that grew together. they are absolutely beautiful. glorious!!

Tanya, Thanks for sharing

By Almanac Staff

Tanya, Thanks for sharing your beginner experience and congrats on your beautiful morning glories!

I recently bought a home with

By kchag

I recently bought a home with a massive amount of morning glories. They are beautiful but they are everywhere. How can I tell if I have an annual or perennial flower? I read that I should cut them back at the end of the summer so it's that time but don't want to if it's an annual. If it's a perennial, do I cut them back almost to the ground or should I leave some of the vine intact? Thank you.

The morning glory vine is an

By Almanac Staff

The morning glory vine is an annual and will generally die after frost. You can cut down in the spring. Up the plant can self-seed profusely. If you want to avoid this, gather all the seed pods and dead vines after the first frost, put in a bag, and give away or discard elsewhere; try not to let the seeds scatter.

One morning there were five

By Farmer 1956

One morning there were five blossoms on a vine of MGs and the temperature was very cool that day....those blossoms did not close until the next afternoon...and we checked for spent blossoms...none! Until the second day...?

my niece brought a morning

By patricia beezub

my niece brought a morning glory home and it had 2 little leaves on it now it has 8 it is in a little pot and I don't know if I can plant it outside now I live in Pa.and the weather is cool

Plant the morning glory in a

By Almanac Staff

Plant the morning glory in a bigger pot and put it outside in the sun. Bring it into a sheltered location if the temp. drops below 40 degrees.

Has flowers, losing leaves.

By djb5718

Has flowers, losing leaves. Recently my morning glory is losing most of its leaves, although it's still flowering nicely and sending out runners. This is its second year, and last year it didn't start losing leaves until it got cold. It hasn't been cold, actually it's been hot. I thought maybe it needs more water, but I see the advice here not to water too much. This is in San Francisco.

Hot weather can also cause

By Almanac Staff

Hot weather can also cause leaves to drop. Check for insect damage on the leaves that have dropped. Don't soak the plant. Give it some water right before the soil is totally dry. Add some mulch around the plant to cool the soil.

Recently had OLD legustrum

By Boots Rule

Recently had OLD legustrum dug up. In between, there were several morning glories, but it seemed that they were dug up too. Now, the vines are popping up all over the place. Have they self-seeded? They are all over the place, w/no decided place to grow.

Yes, morning glories tends to

By Almanac Staff

Yes, morning glories tends to self-seed prolifically so it's important to take care in placement.

This is my first time with

By My first time

This is my first time with morning glories. We have a dead tree and I thought it would be fun. I got the packet from the store along with sunflowers and mixes. I put all the seeds down close to the bottom of the tree. It has grown to far up the tree that I'm afraid it's going to get into the living trees. We climbed up the later and cut the vines completely. I was also bummed that I had not seen flower yet. Across our street are woods so we threw what came down in there thinking it would die off. And for fun I stuck a vine in water. I was told it wouldn't root. It rooted after two weeks. I looked across the street a couple days after we cut the vines off the tree and I thought I saw a blue flower. I go look and what do you know the pieces we tossed are pumping out flowers like you wouldn't believe. Here it is three weeks and the vine in the woods is still producing flower. As well as the top of the tree we we cut. Now flowers are bumming all over. Is this vine like an alien ? The leaves are dead and wilted they don't look good but yet, blue flowers. I'm afraid this stuff is going to take over like the Twilight zone...

My light blue morning glories

By Micki55555

My light blue morning glories are deep purple this year. I noticed this has happened to my neighbors also. What would cause this to happen? We both used seeds from the previous year and new seeds as well.

Air temperature can change

By Almanac Staff

Air temperature can change the color of the flowers. The higher the temperature the lighter the color. If the soil pH changes it can also influence the color.

I am trying to get rid of my

By Rebecca Wesson

I am trying to get rid of my morning glories. I have dug up all the roots( big and deep) many days of working. Now months later I keep pulling up leaves and stems. I assume there are little seeds in the dirt, but I don't know what they look like. Any ideals on how to kill these plants. I have been working on this project for 6 months.

Wild morning glories grow

By Almanac Staff

Wild morning glories grow from rhizomes. Often when you dig up roots some of these smaller rhizomes break off and start new growth. Cover the soil completely to prevent light to get to the seedlings using layers of newspaper or cardboard.

Will covering finally kill

By Rebecca Wesson

Will covering finally kill the plant/or get rid of them, or just keep them dorment. At some point I will want to plant others plants in that bed. Thanks

Me Too! I have one spot with

By Bondelabrenshell

Me Too! I have one spot with 75 blossoms every day, but just around the corner, I have a patch of 10 x 6 ft vines, and no blossoms. Also, most of my Heavenly Blue are distinctly purple. I only get an occasional azure...What's up with that?

Keep the soil covered for one

By Almanac Staff

Keep the soil covered for one season and it should kill the plants, roots and all.

My morning glory is growing

By Melissa Small

My morning glory is growing like crazy, however, it still has not bloomed and shows no signs of buds. Did I do something wrong?

I had to wait until the vines

By Rich Wymore

I had to wait until the vines grew to the top on the fence (6 feet) and spread out sideways a lot before they ever bloomed, but they are starting to bloom now. Be patient!

Here's what our sources say:

By Almanac Staff

Here's what our sources say: Morning glories are happy in well-draining "ordinary" soil. Overfertilization will hinder blooms. and morning glories bloom best in 8 to 10 hours of direct sun daily. We hope this helps!

I can clearly see from other

By Juanita Wiggins

I can clearly see from other inquiries, I have the same problem--beautiful healthy vines and no blooms. I have plenty sun, well drained soil, and proper fertilizer. I guess we just planted on a "non-productive day" just like when you plant peas on bloom day (all vines and no peas) If you come up with a solution, I'd sure like to hear it. My husband can "grow rocks" but problems with this. Thanks

Some varieties do bloom later

By Almanac Staff

Some varieties do bloom later in the season. Morning glories thrive on neglect. If you want to give the plants some fertilizer give them phosphorus and potassium. This may help them bloom.

I was having the same issue.

By Beth Terry

I was having the same issue. My morning glory vines were bushy but no blooms. We had a storm roll thru and it beat them down. When I was checking them for damage I found tiny little flowers. Litterally no bigger than my finger nail. While they are pretty I am disappointed by the size considering I grew everything from seeds and was expecting to see 2-3 in blooms!! You may have the same issues. Had it not been for the storms I would have never known they were there! You might wanna check under your leaves in the thick of it!

i need your help /advice this

By barbara preyer

i need your help /advice

this is the FIRST year my blue glories nave NOT bloomed...
biggest leaves, fat stems, with prickley / thorn like things on some of the stems...???

can you tell me why no blossoms and what are the thorney things on some of the vine...
can you please advise what is happening this year to my blues ...

thank you

Some morning glory varieties

By Almanac Staff

Some morning glory varieties have soft thorns. Did you plant a new variety of morning glories or are these plants from saved seeds?

I thought I planted the large

By Judith A. Siebers

I thought I planted the large scarlet
morning glories, only to have smallish
pink/purple flowers.
Which I just picked a really stubborn
beetle off of a leaf it was eating.
Love your site.

I'm growing glories at the

By susan oleson

I'm growing glories at the base of a aluminum t.v. tower out my south door, they are 5 feet up it already and blooming beautifully, but my problem is for the 1st time ever there is something eating the leaves?? I treated with some 7-dust a week ago, and they are still eating them!! PLEASE HELP!!!

Use Neem oil on fronts and

By Sir Weezy

Use Neem oil on fronts and back of leaves and vines(most eater bugs hate it)...but be sure to discard any xtra solution or use it on other plants nearby...u want to mix just enough because it cannot be used again once mixed..I have grown for years and the ones on my porch exceed 18' insane blooms.....I do my mailbox every year even though it drives my mail person nuts..lol
And I have them on the edge of the woods now..

The leaves of my morning

By Candidi

The leaves of my morning glories were vanishing several years ago...and then I saw a groundhog climbing up the fence to reach the top leaves!

I've been growing them for

By court leubner

I've been growing them for years and never had this problem and couldn't figure it out for the life of me because there were no pieces lying around and the whole huge leaf was gone but the stem. Then someone suggested deer and it makes total sense. Mine are on the mailbox so I'm gonna try wrapping the plats with chicken wire to keep them from getting to the leaves. I don't know why they never bothered them before. Possibly missing something in their diet or one just finally found out they were delicious. Weird!!

Although Sevin is a

By Almanac Staff

Although Sevin is a broad-spectrum insecticide, covering many insects, there are some that it won't control. Look at the label for a list of insects it affects. Perhaps your insect pest is not on that list. (Note that being a broad-spectrum insecticide, Sevin unfortunately kills both the bad bugs and beneficials, and is especially lethal to honeybees and earthworms.)
 
To find clues about your pest, look for signs of caterpillars (including inch-worms), beetles, frass, galls, etc., even on the undersides of the leaves. If these are large holes, consider rabbits, slugs, larger caterpillars, etc. Tiny holes could be flea beetles. Perhaps take a leaf sample to your local nursery--they might be able to identify the pest, or at least the general type, and tell you how best to control it. Good luck!

I love peat pellets ..found

By Kimberly Patton

I love peat pellets ..found at your "W" store...and place im 9X13 " cake pan filled 1/2 way up with water until they are fully expanded and soaked up.drain off excess water and place your seeds in them 1/3 to 1/2 way down inside them.I use pencil(eraser tip) add a cup ir so water in the morning daily - just enough to keep them hydrated fully and 6-7 hours full sun.When plants show & grow,dont forget to keep pellets plumped with water but drain excess after 1 hour.I plant them when there is strong roots showing from out of pellet.Dont tamp down soil when planting, allow it to water in.Remember all flowering,veg's & blooming plants need at least 6-8 hours of full sun daily to perform best.In West Tx I like to give some after noon shade if I can from 3 p.m. on and I mulch beds 2-3 " if cypress shredded mulch to shade roots frim burning and hold water.Especially Roses ...

I love that I found your

By Kimberly Patton

I love that I found your site! I found answers to my blooming morning glory questions even though I've been a plant professional and gardener for 40 years.My ""Scarlett O'Hara's " have only recently started to flower(on the shadier side of the porch bower) but Thunbergia and Hyacinth Bean not yet...Abundant foliage and 12 " vine growth daily..I dont fertilize at all but in the hot dry clime of nearby Abilene Tx,I water daily before noon with gray water.They are lovely and lush, but I'm getting greedy for flowers!I'll be patient.I can tell you that as a child growing up on the Greek island of Crete (and being on similar latitude lines as I am now)many common plants grow here as there.The blue morning glories covered a large patio roof arbor beside our house and came back yearly.I have also grown moonflowers in the past by my kitchen window as the scent in the evening when they open is heaven! A bit of work to start(I always use peat pellets) but well worth the wait to flower.Allow vine to die back naturally in Fall ..leave faded flowers on to get large roundish seed pods to pick & save for next season.I'm hoping my M.glories will come back as perennials, but I'll save seeds also!

I planted about 7 varieties

By RachelZ3

I planted about 7 varieties of morning glories in my new back yard along some netting and posts, as well as a hyacinth bean. I planted one of the same at either end, to see if there was a difference in their growth, as one end is well under an oak tree. I would say that the ones more in the sun are flowering more BUT that's not really the case. The hyacinth bean next to the first morning glory in the sun wont flower or bud but grows with large leaves. Next to the hyacinth bean (more toward the shade) is a beautifully flowering pink morning glory with fluttery edges, (split second) and a red flowering morning glory with spiky leaves (cardinal climber). A black eyes susan variety flowered early and now kinda weak. Then I have 3 varieties that are big leaves, no buds, no flowers and the last, doing almost as well as the first, small leaves, flowers, nice. (Additionally in there I have 2 moon flowers, who grew for about 4 feet and then just kinda stopped. No flowers, no buds, nothing). They were all planted about 12 inches apart. All the ones that flower have small leaves, all the ones that don't flower have huge leaves. So I don't think its about sun or soil or water, since they all have the same, and the ones with the least sun and are the same variety are doing as well as the ones with the most sun.
They have all had the same conditions, all been over watered and under watered the same and I fed them once since I planted them near the end of May. Any idea why the ones that have big leaves are not flowering or even budding? Many thanks

It's true that "usually"

By Almanac Staff

It's true that "usually" morning glories respond to lots of sunlight--especially morning sun. And it's true that they do not like excess fertlizer, especially nitrogen, which causes leafiness at the expensive of buds. But sometimes, they just bloom at different times--some earlier, some later. Sometimes, certain strains just adapt better to certain climates. If you collect seeds, collect from the plants that did well in your garden.

Thank you for your response.

By RachelZ3

Thank you for your response. They're planted on the north side of the house, and it could be that the shape of the house blocks the morning sun from the middle more than the ends. I had the same idea, to collect the seeds from the ones doing well. No seeds to collect from the leafy ones without flowers anyway. I'll see next summer how it goes :)
Very interesting about the nitrogen. I fed them once, I wont do it again.

I planted a heavenly blue

By barbara hubertus

I planted a heavenly blue morning glory for the first time. I bought it from a garden center. It is now July 15 and still no blossoms. I might add that the bottom leaves are turning a milky white green while the upper leaves are still green. There is no blight seen on the outside of the leaf. One suggestion was that the green leaves are depleting the lower ones of nitrogen possibly? Help!

I have the same problem! I

By Cheri D Dotson

I have the same problem! I live in Palm Springs, ca, where it is very hot and dry. My m glories look faded and there are no blooms..what should I do?

In the Dallas area morning

By beckyd

In the Dallas area morning glories grow best if planted in LATE spring when the soil has warmed up. Try to plant them against a south facing wall or support for maximum flowering. Sun almost all day, and they bloom all together for 2-3 weeks late in the summer. Not intermittently. It is a glorious display. Also- pre-place support wires for them.
bd

Do you have buds? Heavenly

By Almanac Staff

Do you have buds? Heavenly Blue morning glories can take 90 days to mature. They are very pretty but also one of the late bloomers. In terms of the leaves: Just give them full sun--not just morning sun. Do not use fertilizer. They like poor soil.

very tallbut never

By cecilia dodson

very tallbut never bloom--this is my 4th season f trying on east side of house help

Morning glories need bright

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories need bright sunlight ALL day--and they are only getting sun half of the day on the east side of the house. Also, they like poor, dry soil; If the soil is high in nitrogen and very fertile, it produces lush leaves but no flowers.

How do you 'seed' a morning

By CountryMouse103

How do you 'seed' a morning glory? I want to save seeds from next year as the M. Glorys I have came from a friend in NC.

Seed a morning glory in the

By Almanac Staff

Seed a morning glory in the spring after the soil's warmed up.
Before you seed, soak in water overnight or nick seeds with nail files. This helps them germinate because they have a hard seed coat. The nice thing about morning glories is that they'll grow well in most any soil--even poor infertile soil. Plant in a site that get full sun.

built my own planter box-

By karin 'new gardener'

built my own planter box- planted carrots, potatoes, snapdragons, bell peppers, cucumbers, and poppy flowers--well see how it turns out! fall harvest or bundle blunder? any way we'll see. btw can you plant ALL THAT in planet box at same time? they've lots of space to grow:)

I'm same as 4-5 weeks ago.

By Lisa Bordelon

I'm same as 4-5 weeks ago. Is thear any way I can save them thear almost all dead

Ok so about 4 r 5 weeks ago

By Lisa Bordelon

Ok so about 4 r 5 weeks ago I planed a mix of red and blue spread out in a large pot bout and inch or two deep. 3 days later they sprouted and was about finger length tall Four days hand length. The just kept shooting up like a rocket. Well I can to the conclusion that I water them to much and they don't get enough light I mean both was obvious. Well now my little vines dieying. What do I do. Can I help them com back befor that all die Pleas email me ASAP. Pleas

Lisa, Are you saying that you

By Almanac Staff

Lisa, Are you saying that you have all straggly vine and no blooms? In general, just water morning glories when they start to wilt. Keep the soil moderately moist to dry. They really prefer drier soil. If the vine is really long, you could try to cut it back to a set of green leaves up to 1/3 of the vine and see how it responds. Hopefully, the soil will dry out and make growing conditions more favorable. The vine may also reseed itself. If you replant, make sure the soil dries out and ensure that you seed 6 to 12 inches apart so that they do not get crowded.

Oh ok iv been keeping dirt

By Lisa Bordelon

Oh ok iv been keeping dirt wet but not muddy

Lisa are you from Louisiana?

By Carol D'Agostino

Lisa are you from Louisiana? Are morning glory annuals?

When I plant the seeds how

By dorran

When I plant the seeds how many do I put together and how far apart from the next ones. I bought about 5 packets. I want to cover a 12 ft fence

Seed 6 to 8 seeds per foot.

By Almanac Staff

Seed 6 to 8 seeds per foot. Then think to 12 inches apart.

lots of foliage - no flowers.

By captev

lots of foliage - no flowers. Morning sun good drainage. Also would like to prune them. Any suggestions? BTW I'm in Phoenix. 100 + temps.

Wait. The flowers will come!

By firefli0523

Wait. The flowers will come! Mine went CRAZY with long vines and went everywhere, I almost lost hope and then BOOM! Flowers everywhere. I wouldn't prune unless they are strangling another plant(mine tried to) or really getting in the way of something.

Our non Profit organization

By Plant lover forever

Our non Profit organization has a citywide beautification program, and We are planting morning glories plants in the Public view. We're asking our fellow neighbors to plant a Morning-glory plant in honor of someone they love. Morning glory flowers reminds us that every morning we should give God glory for another glorious day.

This spring I noticed that I

By Brenker

This spring I noticed that I have Morning Glories growing along my fence in a corner in my backyard. Since none of my neighbors seems to have them, I'm wondering where they came from. Could they have been propagated by seeds the birds may have dropped? Besides this peculiarity, would they be a good plant to encourage growth along my chain link fence?

Don't know were they could of

By Justin Blair

Don't know were they could of come from, but I love Morning Glories. I wish I had a fence to grow them. I live in a apartment and grow them in pots. They are a great plant to encourage. Especially if you have a fence for them to climb. They are low maintenance and very pretty when the flowers bloom.

Yes, morning glory (Ipomoea

By Almanac Staff

Yes, morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor) vines can self-seed quite prolifically. They great for chain link fences. They grow in just a few weeks -- and will grow to 10 to 15-feet-tall. Just beware of placement because they can take over!

At what time of day will

By Ann Murray

At what time of day will morning glories close? We have an afternoon wedding and hope they will stay open until the evening (5:00 p.m.) in September in PA. Hmmmm.

You might have luck with the

By tuna fish

You might have luck with the morning glory variety, moonflower. The flower is white and I believe they open mid-to-late afternoon.
http://files.shroomery.org/files/12-42/049929959-014.jpg

Morning glories open before

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories open before sunrise and usually close early afternoon. If you don't want to change the wedding to mid morning you may want to plant a different flower. 'Four O'clocks' Mirabilis jalapa open in late afternoon...

If I leave my morning glories

By Mike Timm

If I leave my morning glories in a pot....what do I do in fall/ winter... Cut vines and bring indoors?

Morning glories are annuals

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories are annuals and will not survive the winter months. Save some seeds and start new plants next spring.

Mind do.they have come back

By Rebecca Wesson

Mind do.they have come back for 10 years.

I live in 5B zone. We planted

By Donna Abrams

I live in 5B zone. We planted morning glories from seed in our newly purchased green house . They are about an inch tall in the little cups. It says to plant the entire cup, but when shall I plant them? Thanks so much.

I have not had good luck

By Lisa G

I have not had good luck planting the pots (even though they say they are biodegradable). When I dug up my garden from last year, the pots were still there. No wonder my pepper and tomato plants were not growing. This year, I took my pepper and tomato plants out of the pots and they are growing like they should. I hope this helps!

Wait until the seedlings are

By Almanac Staff

Wait until the seedlings are about 2 inches tall and the night temperatures don't dip below 40 degrees.

Do morning glories flower

By Tim Treece

Do morning glories flower better or do they need morning sun?

Morning glories prefer full

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories prefer full sun but will do well with bright morning sun and some shade in the afternoon.

I have the same problem as

By Connie komomua

I have the same problem as anonymous on May 18. Two to three inches and then they simply stopped growing. They have been siting there for three weeks now with no growth. Some are in pots and some are in the ground, the ones in pots are in full sun and the ones in the ground are in full to partial.

How can I control the mg?

By Joan glassmyer

How can I control the mg? They keep coming back and take over the front porch and garden. We pulled them out 1st year. Came back

First time grower

By Anonymous

I have been trying to grow Morning Glories on the chain link fence on my patio. I soak the seeds, plant them, they start to grow. They get to about three inches tall, bloom, then die, or some small critter eats all the leaves off it and they die. Any suggestions?

Morning Glories trailing down vs up?

By Anonymous

Will it matter if I let my morning glories trail down vs up? I would like to plant my seeds in a deep planter that hangs on the deck railing.... letting the vines cascade downward. Will this be a problem?

morning glories

By Anonymous

No. Morning Glories are beautiful planted in hanging baskets or window boxes. My sister grew her morning glories in a window box and let then grown down. Was a beautiful cascade of flowers.

morning glory seeds

By Anonymous

I read that before I plant morning glories I need to scratch the seed open and then soak for 24 hours. But when the natural seeds drop to the ground to re seed they, of course don't do that. Why can't I just plant the seeds.
Thanks

Well, you CAN. It's just that

By Anonymous

Well, you CAN. It's just that more will successfully germinate this way. The seed has kind of a hard coat, and the soaking/filing helps the plant to break through that.

Perennial vs Annual

By Anonymous

Hi, I'm interested in planting morning glories on a short fence to make a green wall. Which kind should I use to have the greenery year round and the flowers for as long as they bloom? I live in San Diego and they will get full sun. Or, do you have any other suggestions? I have a brown thumb and used to have the perennial which survived me! Thank you :-)

San Diego is really dry so I

By Jdjimison

San Diego is really dry so I would treat the soil or trade it out with some flowering soil from a garden center. Soak the seeds overnight like they say, and maybe ask the locals what balance of fertilizer they use based on experience with that. I don't remember seeing morning glories when I was there for a week, but if you search for native flowering vines or those recommended for all the variables (how far from the water, how high). They can't have a lot of wind so in my opinion it's a gamble but good luck!

morning glories

By Anonymous

hello,
i have been growing morning glories in my college dorm just for fun, and a while ago their leaves started to wilt and turn a pale yellow color. i thought it was because the plastic tub i was growing it in was constricting their roots. so today i reppotted them without disturbing the soil. but now im wondering if i may have been overwatering them? would that explain the pale yellow leaves and wilting?

Yellow leaves are due to over

By Anonymous

Yellow leaves are due to over watering, if you have a plastic pot it's probably not getting a good enough drainage. Only water when soil is dry. I have found if you water it to religiously, you will get vine growth but no flowers. Hope that helps!

Propigating Morning Glories by stem

By Anonymous

I live in a rental so I prefer to stay with plants I can take with me.Last year I had luck starting a plant by stem. I had read that you can basically start a new plant by just putting them in good potted soil with drainage and sun.Is this a normal thing to do,or did I just get lucky?

Unlikely with this kind.

By Jdjimison

Unlikely with this kind. These seeds grow fine and are easy to find anywhere. They do not survive past 1 year even indoors tho. They don't take long to fill a hanging basket tho, and one packet of seeds should fill several baskets. I would be prepared to move them indoor/outdoor tho bc they need lots of sun depending on the intensity in your area.

Toxic seeds

By Anonymous

I read that the seeds are very toxic is this true for dogs too? I want to plant in the dog run to grow along the back fence.

Morning glories are toxic if

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories are toxic if your dog ingests the plant or seeds. It is listed as a toxic plant for pets on the ASPCA website.

Morning Glories

By Anonymous

My roommate planted Morning Glories out of a packet a few years ago. They come back every year and she has never re-seeded. Is this normal?

no it is done by

By Anonymous

no it is done by magic...........gods magic.......my magic and yours ;)

Morning Glories

By Anonymous

Someone told me that the hybrids won't come back every year, but seeds that aren't hybrids will. Where did she get the seeds?

morning glory hybrids

By Anonymous

I have produced a hybrid myself. As a rule of thumb; The first generation will produce seed but they may not be hybrid but just carrying on one of the original strands it's a 50/50 chance

Seeds

By Anonymous

She bought them from Lowes or Home Depot - they were the packets of seeds. The packet even said annuals on them, just wasn't sure if anyone else experienced this!

I have them in a house we

By Anonymous

I have them in a house we bought. They do come back every year if the seeds winter through. All I do in one they go to seed shake the fence. I don't even cover them in dirt as they are becoming invasive. I am zone 6 a

I have a morning glory

By Anonymous

I have a morning glory growing on a cement wall with lattice last year it did great this year the leaves look burnt and not growing as much could it be getting too much sun or could it have a pest?

If the leaves look dried out,

By Almanac Staff

If the leaves look dried out, it could be wind burn? Has it been cold and windy? There are some varieties of morning glory that are more hardy than others if your wall is in a place that gets hit harder by weather.

is it alright to plant morning glory around the base of a tree?

By Anonymous

I have an oak tree in my yard that I would like to plant morning glory around. Would this damage the tree in any way?

Planting around a tree

By Anonymous

No it won't harm the tree if it is well established ie more then a few years old
Your biggest problem would be wether or not the morning glories will get enough sun

We do not think that morning

By anonymous

We do not think that morning glory vines are strong enough to kill an established solid oak tree. Keep in mind that the vine prefers about 5 hours of direct sun to flower well so it would not grow well in the shade of a tree.

Quantity question

By Anonymous

I grew morning glories last year in a pot, but this year we are moving and I will have an actual garden with an arch to grow morning glories on.

Most of the recommendations say to grow them about 8 inches apart. What if I am looking for a look like this?:

http://cdn.buzznet.com/assets/users16/gummibearsss1/default/morning-glories--large-msg-128827347584.jpg

Or this: http://images.meredith.com/bhg/images/2008/10/p_BHG138955.jpg

Do you just kind of "break the rules"?

Any advice is appreciated. :)

You can plant the seeds

By Almanac Staff

You can plant the seeds closer than 8 inches apart, but be careful so that the plants don't shade each other and that you have enough support for lots of vines.

Pots For Morning Glorys

By Anonymous

I've heard that if you plant a morning glory in a pot it should be a clay pot. Is this tru or can you use a ceramic pot?

We haven't heard this. Just

By Almanac Staff

We haven't heard this. Just know that clay or "unglazed" ceramic pots --while more natural-- are porous so the soil will dry out more quickly than plastic containers and you need to water more often. When you plant edible flowers, be sure to use a non-toxic pot.

containers

By Anonymous

How do mgs do in a container with a lattice to grow up on. How high should the lattice be?
Thanks

If you are growing morning

By Almanac Staff

If you are growing morning glories in a container instead of the ground, just make sure it's a big pot (2 feet diameter, 1.5 feet high) as they need a lot of root space. They'll start out slowly take off by mid-summer. You need a tall lattice so that they don't twist around and choke themselves. Buy three four by four posts, and attach lattice panels of the appropriate size and number. Hope this helps.

starting morning glories inside

By Anonymous

I have started my morning glories inside already, not anticipating they would sprout and grow as quick as they did. They are growing pretty quick and i was wondering is it too early to put them outside.... or a better question, what is the lowest temperature they can withstand? It's early march here in Carolina, and the temps are only in the 60's during the day, and gets down in the upper 30's/lower 40's at night. I think i might have jumped the gun on this one

Yes, it is too early to set

By Almanac Staff

Yes, it is too early to set your seedlings outside. Morning glories need soil temps of at 65 degrees.

seedlings

By Anonymous

I've heard morning glories do not like to be transplanted. Almanac staff?

There is both an "annual" as

By Almanac Staff

There is both an "annual" as well as the wild plant. Wild morning glories don't transplant well. The annual morning glories can be transplanted as long as you do not disturb the root ball once they start growing. One idea is to seed them in peat plants that you can simply plant in the soil. It is important to wait until the chance of frost is long gone.

Proper Sunlight

By Anonymous

I have an area on the north side of my house that has a very glaring white fence that I was hoping to have a flowering vine growing on. The base of the plant will be always shaded, but the vine will receive sunlight about 3 ft. from base. Any chance for Morning Glory?

As long as the sun hits the

By Almanac Staff

As long as the sun hits the leaves, that should be fine. Morning glories prefer about 5 hours of direct sun to flower well. They do better with morning sun rather than afternoon sun. The more sun, the better! The seeds are easy to sow so you may need to experiment and find out how it works in your climate.

Mutant Morning Glory?

By Anonymous

I know this sounds silly, but I had a few morning glories growing up a bakers rack. One of the plants, in a planter seperate from the others, grew up and bloomed much later than the others. When it fnally did, produced flowers, they were a very bright blue and as big as my hand. My other plants were about the size of a silver dollar. Is this common or am I mistaken?

Morning glory mystery

By Almanac Staff

We suppose that it is possible that your large-flowered plant is a mutation, but perhaps more likely it is due to other factors. Bloom time and bloom size may be affected by the variety and/or the growing conditions.

Was the giant morning glory from the same seed packet as the others? If so, it could be that being separate from the others gave it more room to grow, or it had different soil/more nutrients, or better lighting conditions that made that plant thrive. Or, the seed packet was a mix of different types that included this more vigorous version.

If this was part of a pack of seedlings you had purchased from a nursery, it is possible that this particular plant was of a different variety that accidentally got mixed in with the others. There are many cultivars/varieties of morning glory. Some of the newer ones are especially large. You can even find double flowered forms. Of course, the classic 'Heavenly Blue' has striking bright blue flowers.

morning glory

By Anonymous

why morning glory named morning?

morning glory

By Anonymous

it is named Morning Glory Because it blooms in the morning

The name "morning glory"

By Almanac Staff

The name "morning glory" comes from the fact the flowers open every morning.

They are "magic flowers".

By Anonymous

We should be more like them.

storing morning glory seeds till the next year

By Anonymous

How do you properly store these seeds?

storing morning glory seeds till the next year

By Anonymous

If you do not plan to immediately plant the seeds, store them in a dry place out of direct light and in a moderately cool environment until planting time.

Read more: How to harvest morning glory seeds | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4418656_harvest-morning-glory-seeds.html#ixzz27rsDFy1z

You can also store the seeds

By Almanac Staff

You can also store the seeds in the fridge or freezer.

What do I do to the morning

By Anonymous

What do I do to the morning glory vines before winter. I live in CT. Do I cut the vines down from my arbor or just leave them for next year?

Most morning glories are

By Almanac Staff

Most morning glories are annuals in colder climates. Save some of the seeds for next year and cut the vines down. Cover the soil around the arbor with mulch and with a little luck you may see some new growth from the old plant next spring.

Picking Morning Glories

By Anonymous

If I pick some of my morning glory flowers to make, say, a garland, will they still furl up and close after noon or will they be "frozen" in an open state? Also, if I pick the flowers, will the vine it came from still grow flowers in its place or will the vine be barren in that spot?

And I've always wondered, when the morning glories die each day, do the flowers fall off the vine or do they shrivel up infinitesimally? I've always wondered why there were no "bodies"...

Picking morning glories

By Almanac Staff

Morning glories are not commonly used as cut flowers. For best luck cut them while still in bud, crush the stem and put into water. It will bloom but not last long. You can prune morning glory vines for a bushier plant.

no flowering morning glorys

By Anonymous

How can I lower the nitrogen in my soil,if not for this year for next year.

No flowering morning glories

By Almanac Staff

Mulch with sawdust or bark mulch. These mulches will use the nitrogen in the soil as they break down. Some leftover nitrogen in the soil will leach out through runoff during fall and winter. Plant some vegetables among the morning glories next year. Broccoli, cabbage and corn will use up nitrogen in the soil.

no flowering morning glorys

By Anonymous

Long time admirer first time grower.grew mgs from seed transplantet at about 3"vines are booming but no blooms in site.some in pots with miracle grow potting soil,some in the ground.both growing at the same rate but no buds.I alternated moon flowers and morning glorys 6" apart on two sides of my gazebo.with nylon twine 6" apart look very nice but no blooms.going thru a drought now but water them every other day.what can I do.Keith from ill.

You may have the wrong

By Almanac Staff

Lack of blooms often means too much nitrogen or the wrong kind of fertilizer--or, nitrogen seeping from nearby lawns. Do not fertilize your morning glories. Also, only water when they the soil is dry to the knuckle. They thrive in poor soil with little care.

morning glory

By Anonymous

I have a morning glory plant but it never flowers. It grows like crazy with lots of vines but no flowers . Any suggestions ?

Colin

Some morning glories take a

By Almanac Staff

Some morning glories take a little longer to bloom, but lots of vines and lack of flowers often means too much nitrogen or the wrong kind of fertilizer--or, nitrogen seeping from nearby lawns. Do not fertilize morning glories. They thrive in poor soil. Also, make sure they get plenty of sun!

ANOTHER MORNING GLORY

By Anonymous

FRIENDS LIVE RIGHT ON THE RIVER AND THE BANK IS FULL OF MORNING GLORIES....CAN THESE BE REPLANTED IN YOUR YARD?...THEY ARE GROWING IN THE EDGE OF THE MARSH...THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF THEM BUT LOOK LIKE A BRUSH

Wild morning glories don't

By Almanac Staff

Wild morning glories don't transplant well. They don't like their roots disturbed. Also, note that wild morning glories (bindweed) are invasive--and different than the beloved annual Morning Glories that we plant by seed.

root system

By Anonymous

How deep do the roots go? There is concern if the roots go deep.

Morning glories -- annual flower

By Almanac Staff

There are 2 kinds of morning glories. The ANNUAL is a lovely flower--which you reseed each year. It doesn't have deep roots. Then there is a perennial morning glory which an invasive weed and often chokes out other plants.

Morning Glory's

By loubabe1

----
Would it be possible/practical to grow the morning glory in a hanging basket? I'm looking for something different for my hanging baskets. I live in an apt. and hanging baskets are the only way I can grow flowers. For some reason they don't allow vineing plants. Maybe I could train them up and around the basket wires. then they could just trail down. How many plants would look good per basket?

Thanks

Morning glories in a pot.

By Anonymous

Last year I took chicken wire and made a tub and put it in a large plastic round pot. I put the two seedlings in the middle of the pot on the inside of the tub and I put Wave light pink wave petunias around the outside of the tomato cage. Put the pot in a corner of my deck and hoped for the best. It was beautiful I am glad that I bought two feet chicken wire because those two seedlings took off and bloomed like crazy. Next year I am going to do two of this in the soil in sections of my planting beds to add height. But I think this would be beautiful and it was cheap and easy. The Wave petunias did very well also. And the effect of the blue morning glories and the pink Petunias was amazing.

Flowers for baskets

By Almanac Staff

You may also enjoy this article for suggestions on flowers to put in a basket or window box: http://www.almanac.com/content/window-boxes-best-bets

Morning glories and hanging baskets

By Almanac Staff

Hmmm. Good question. Normally, we would say morning glories aren't the best for hanging baskets as the vine will start to wrap itself around the container. If you're OK letting the vines go to the ground, perhaps you could twine them around each other. If possible, look for Sunsmiles Morning Glories and Sidare Morning Glories because they are dwarf trailing varities and are not 'climbers'. No other plants can go in this basket as you won't see them. Another idea: Have you tried nasturtiums? Gorgeous and edible, too!

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