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Plums

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Botanical name: Prunus

Plant type: Fruit

Sun exposure: Full Sun

Soil type: Loamy

Bloom time: Summer, Fall

Plums are a good choice for beginner gardeners who want to grow fruit trees. Plum trees are widely adapted, more compact, and require less treatment than most fruit trees. Not only are plums delicious, but the trees themselves add beauty to any garden.

Planting

  • Be prepared to plant more than one type of plum tree because many types require cross-pollination to produce fruit, although there are some varieties that can produce fruit on their own.
  • It is also important to choose a type that will work with your location. There are three categories of plum trees: European, Japanese, and Damson. Hardy European types work in most regions across the U.S. The Japanese types flourish where peach trees flourish. There are also American hybrids that work well in regions where neither European or Japanese types flourish.
  • Plant plum trees in well-drained, moderately fertile soil in full sun. Avoid planting in low areas where frost may settle, as the frost will damage your trees.
  • If possible, find sheltered position, such as a south- or west-facing spot out of the wind. This will help the plum tree set fruit.
  • For container-grown trees, remove the plant from its pot and remove any circling roots by laying the root ball on its side and using shears to cut through the roots.
  • For grafted trees, keep the graft union 1 inch above the soil line when planting.
  • Dig a hole that is a few inches deeper and wider than the spread of the roots. Set the tree on top of a small mound of soil in the middle of the hole. Be sure to spread the roots away from the trunk without excessively bending them.
  • Space standard-size trees 20 to 25 feet apart. Space dwarf trees 15 to 20 feet apart.

Care

  • Thinning plum trees is important to prevent branches breaking under the weight of the trees. If branches do break, prune them back into the undamaged wood, ideally cutting back to a natural fork to avoid leaving stubs.
  • Be sure to water the young trees heavily every week during the first growing season to help promote growth. Then, water regularly. It's best to water the plant deeply at the soil line, then let the soil dry out (though not completely), and then water again.
  • Water your tree well into mid-October to give it plenty of moisture through the winter months.
  • Do not fertilize young fruit trees unti they have set a crop.
  • Once established, fruit production requires regular fertilizing all year long. If there’s good fruit set, fertilize with one pound calcium nitrate
    per tree or 1½ lb. 10-10-10. Cut back the nitrogen in fall and winter to avoid encouraging new growth in those seasons.
  • In the fall, rake away all debris and fallen trees.
  • Prune early spring or mid-summer to avoid infection. The best time for pruning is usually spring for young trees and mid-summer for established ones.
  • Do NOT prune in the fall or winter injury or infection may occur.
  • Did you have any pest issues? Talk to your local extension or garden center about a spray program.
  • To prevent winter injury: Consider a tree wrap or guard around the lower trunk, especially for a young plum tree.
  • Keep an eye on the lower bark and branches for mice or rabbit injury; if this could be a problem, you may need to install tree guards or fence in young trees with chicken wire for the winter.

Pruning: Japanese Plum

  • If you have a Japanese type of tree, the best pruning method is to create an open center shape. In the summer of the first year, cut the vigorous shoots that form on the top of the tree by two or three buds. After about a month, check the tree. As soon as you have three wide-angled branches, spaced equally apart, cut back any other branches so that these three are the main branches. In the early summer of the second year, cut back the branches in the middle of the tree to short stubs and prune any shoots developing below the three main branches. After the third year, remove any shoots in the center of the tree to keep its shape.
  • Japanese types require heavy pruning to help keep them in shape and to produce better fruit. It is also good to thin out the fruit on these types of trees. You should space the plums about 3 to 4 inches apart on each branch.

Pruning: European Plum

  • If you have a European type of tree, the best pruning method is to create a central leader. This shape features a central trunk with branches that spiral out every 5 to 8 inches, making sure that no branch is directly above another. The training for such a system begins in the early summer of the first year, during which time you should remove any shoots that form within 18 inches of the ground. The end result should resemble a Christmas tree.
  • European types do not require fruit thinning because they do not produce as much fruit as Japanese types. However, the fruit on these types should be spaced about 2 inches apart on each branch.
  • To help control pests and diseases, remember to prune your trees to keep them open. You can also mulch around the trees in the spring to help control weeds, but be sure to remove the mulch in the late fall so that no pests use it over the winter. You can also lightly cultivate the soil around your trees in late spring to eliminate any pests in the soil.

Pests

Plum trees can suffer from silver leaf disease, honey fungus, bacterial canker, pocket plum, plum aphids and plum moth.

Contact your local cooperative extension to implement a spraying program to manage for these problems.

Harvest/Storage

  • Harvest have the best flavor when left to ripen on the tree. You can tell when plums are ripe by applying gentle pressure with your fingers. If the skin of the fruit feels soft, then it is ready to be picked.
  • Plums should come off the tree easily when you're using only a slight twist.
  • Unfortunately, the fruit does not store for long, so must be eaten or preserved. You can also pick the fruit when they are still slightly firm and store them in a cool place to fully ripen.
  • The best place to store plums is in the refrigerator. The best temperature for storing plums is about 31° - 32°F with relative humidity around 90% - 95%; if kept at this temperature, plums may last for 2 to 4 weeks.
  • You can also store plums by making jams or jellies.
  • Plums can also be stored by freezing or drying them (dried plums are prunes).

Recommended Varieties

  • For a Japanese type, try the 'Satsuma', which produces large, dark-red plums. This kind is good for eating fresh and canning because of its sweet taste.
  • For a European type, try the 'Stanley'. This type is works great for the eastern regions and some of the northwest regions of the U.S. It is self-fertile, meaning no cross-pollination is necessary. It produces medium to large plums and is great for cooking, canning, or eating fresh.
  • American hybrid trees, such as 'Alderman', 'Superior', and 'Underwood', also make good choices. These trees combine the taste of the Japanese variety with the hardiness of the European variety. These types work well for regional extremes.

Recipes

Comments

I have one satsuma plum tree

By janicel leach on October 28

I have one satsuma plum tree in the yard. How far away can I plant the santa rosa plum tree and still have pollination occur?

Thank you so much for all the

By Ritu Sharma

Thank you so much for all the useful information here. I have a plum tree 4 years old. I dont know the type. It has some fruits the very first year but none after that. Anyway, I am writing it for another reason- I noticed some brown shiny sticky bubble type things on stem and few branches. it looks like it is spreading and those branches look unhealthy. yesterday I bought Bayor advanced from homedepot and used it around the tree as instructed. I also tried to remove the bubbles as much as i can. Also, i never pruned it. I dont want my tree to die. Please help.

Hello, Ritu: Professor Plum

By Almanac Staff

Hello, Ritu: Professor Plum back on the case. Your tree is stressed, and those are sap bubbles that it is exuding. It's possible that you have borers of some type (see if there are little wood specks near the bubble holes), but this is unlikely if the damage is not limited to down near the ground. You also might have a fungal or bacterial infection (well, your tree might have). Or, your tree could just be thirsty and too hot. So... Make sure your tree gets a good watering every 3 days for two weeks. Then every 4 days. Put down some hardwood mulch to help retain the moisture. Get an organic, copper-based fungicide and apply as directed. I am giving you an A+ for caring so much!

Our plum tree has a serious

By meltsutton

Our plum tree has a serious case of black knot (just figuring this out now actually). It hasn't successfully bore fruit for 4 seasons, this is the first season the fruit is still on the tree and plentiful! Some plums look decent where others look drippy and sick (but still hanging and ripening).. The big debate around here, is the fruit safe to eat?! From reading up on black knot, the spores seem to be easily airborn and transferrable.. Which really makes me wary of consuming the fruit. Please advise! Many thanks :)

Question about plum tree vs

By Fwessel

Question about plum tree vs roots. I have been growing a Plum tree in my rear yard for five or six years now with full sun and no success. The gardener looked at it and said two of the trunk branches are roots and the center one is the tree. However it appears to be dead. So the question is what to do next? Cut the whole thing down and start over? Or graft branches on to the existing roots? And if I do a graft, can I put two types of trees on the same root stock?

You can give grafting a try.

By Almanac Staff

You can give grafting a try. And yes, you can graft two different (or more) varieties on the same root stock. Plum, peach, nectarine, and apricot are all good choices.

This guy is selling plum tree

By Michele Vermillion

This guy is selling plum tree seedlings that have sprouted up all over his yard around his plum tree! He doesn't know what type of tree it is but said the plums are really good! Will these seedlings produce the same delicious plums if I buy one and transplant it or am I just wasting my time and money?

Hi, Michele: We had to

By Almanac Staff

Hi, Michele: We had to consult with Professor Plum on this one because you have rolled up a lot of good questions into just a few sentences! We can't get into shopping advice here, which is good because there are some big question marks, like who is "this guy"?, did you see him get the seedlings from his yard?, are the plums really good to begin with?, is he selling root upshoots (suckers) or real seedlings?, and how much does he want for them? Most good trees come from grafting a known producer onto a new rootstock, so starting from the ground up is often an adventure. Assuming that he does not want much for these, we might take one just for the fun of it to see what happens. Then again, we could go buy some plums and follow the directions in the forum below get some seeds from them and start from there. Plus, we would have the enjoyment of eating the plums. Or, we could do both. Professor Plum is either nodding his head in agreement or nodding off. Good luck!

We had a lot of plums this

By Ry Reid

We had a lot of plums this year but the plums had holes in them and looked like sugar cystals coming out of the holes. What causes this damage?

Sounds like you have an

By jpbeck

Sounds like you have an infestation of a fruitworm. you can't do anything about it this year, but next year spray tree in the dormant season with a oil, and lime/sulfur (for Pseudomonas seringii if you have spotting on the leaves).

Moved and thereis a plum tree

By patrica

Moved and thereis a plum tree in yard how do I know what kind of plum tree it is?

We're not sure where you

By Almanac Staff

We're not sure where you live. There are many varieties of plum trees. We'd suggest that you contact your local cooperative extension. You may be able to send a sample. Here is a list of state contacts: 

http://www.almanac.com/content/cooperative-extension-services

I bought a plum tree recently

By Cheryll Adams

I bought a plum tree recently and the name was Plum Bourbon S/D...could you tell me if that variety needs other fruit trees to pollinate and produce fruit?

Q i have a plum tree i dint

By chino

Q i have a plum tree i dint know what kind it is. it's been 3yre now no flowers no blossom no nothing. it look healthy lots of leafs. but no fruits. can u help with tha.

First, be aware that there

By Almanac Staff

First, be aware that there are some flowering plum trees which are ornamental and do not produce fruit. If it's a fruit-bearing tree, plum trees do not start bearing fruit until they are five or six years old. There are a number of reasons for trees of fruit-bearing age to have issues. The main reasons are: frost damage, lack of pollination, extreme temperatures, or other weather conditions (too rainy or windy). 

My fruit trees froze this

By Coziah11

My fruit trees froze this year so I know that I wont get any fruit but for some reason some of my trees are not even leafing out. We can tell that the tree's are still living. Is there something that we can do make it at least leaf out?

A freeze will cause leaves to

By Almanac Staff

A freeze will cause leaves to wilt, but your plum tree usually deals with bad weather conditions by developing back-up buds. It's just a waiting game now.

I have a Stanley type prune

By Richard S

I have a Stanley type prune tree 6 to 7 years old. Over the years it has flowered but never fruited. I thought this tree was self pollinating. The tree is flowering now ( May). What can I do to get it to fruit this year?

Ah, yes... this reminds us of

By Almanac Staff

Ah, yes... this reminds us of the trials of our recently departed father-in-law Stanley, who grew Stanley plums (and just about everything else under the Sun) in Zone 7a just because ... well, you understand. He had a whole litany of stories about plums (and his figs, too), but the bottom line is this: Coddle your tree. Then coddle it some more. In general, there are two reasons why a blossoming Stanley plum tree won't fruit: (1) Weather stress/damage. Even though it has flowered, there may be inherent damage from frost or cold that remains. Or, it may be stressed from wind or abrupt changes of some sort. So think of it as a little baby, and give it water, a little food, and Sun, but watch over it and protect it from everything else. (2) Professor Plum's #2 reason, as our Stanley once learned, is this: It's not a Stanley plum at all, but a flowering plum or non-self-pollinating type. Sorry: Our Stanley would never forgive us if we didn't bring this up. So, continue to be patient ... and show the love!

My plum tree has something

By P Maturo

My plum tree has something that looks like sap coming out of some of the branches. I'm not sure if it got froze and slit and that is why it is oozing sap. In 2012 it really produced a lot of fruit but not in 2013. Well, it did produce but all the plums fell off while very small and green. It is doing the same thing this year so far and that is when I noticed the sap coming out. Any suggestions on what to do now??

This does not sound good.

By Almanac Staff

This does not sound good. Oozing is a sign of borer activity, which, once started, is difficult to control. The clearwing moth lays eggs on the base of the tree trunk and upper roots, and the larvaae tunnel into the tree just below the bark. Preventative sprays (permethrin, carbaryl) from eaarly July through September may help. But frmo your description, by July it may be too late.
See here for more information: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plum-pests.pdf

Can you identify a type of

By marvin greene

Can you identify a type of plum for me? It grows in Georgia, it is large and it remains green with greenish yellow stripes on it when ripe. The owner said it was a "old timey" (Heirloom?)variety. Best plum I have ever eaten. Thanks for your advice.

When we think of green plums,

By Almanac Staff

When we think of green plums, we think of "Green Gage Plum" which is an old variety from Europe which many do believe is the finest of all plums. It disappeared for a while but has made a comeback--and it does grow in Georgia. Search "Green Gage" or "greengage" plum to see if this is it.

hi i need a advice i baught a

By elie

hi i need a advice i baught a plum formosa .and i want to know how to plant thanks

If you're planting this type

By Almanac Staff

If you're planting this type of plum tree, just keep in mind that it has a wider spread (15 to 20 feet). As with most plums, plant in fertile, well-drained soil and ensure periodic deep watering in summer months. See this page for more plum planting information.

I would like to know about

By Dorsey

I would like to know about how big the root system can be for a satsuma plum tree?? Thank you for any comments in advance...

I just moved and there are

By Mias05

I just moved and there are plum trees that look very sad with smaller shoots all over the place, the main plum trees look almost all the way dead but there are still some live branches on them. Should I get rid of all the small ones so that all the energy can go to the big ones? If its not worth it can I cut the big on and let one of the shoots grow?

i have 7 japense plum trees

By Terry Nicholson

i have 7 japense plum trees and they are grown to about 8 or 9 ft tall can you tell me when i might get some fruit from them have had them now almost 5 years and as of yet no fruit on them can you tell me is there something i might be doing wrong with them thanks you for your help in this matter Mr. Nicholson

  Hi Terry, Depending on the

By Almanac Staff

 
Hi Terry,
Depending on the variety you have you may need a different variety of plum for cross pollination. Check the chart at
http://ucanr.edu/sites/fruitreport/files/132874.pdf
It may take five to six years after planting before the trees will produce fruit. When the trees are between 8 and 10 years old they will have maximum fruit production.

must I leave some water

By Mark Sturtevant

must I leave some water sprouts when pruning flowering plum tree?

During the summer after the

By Almanac Staff

During the summer after the first winter pruning, remove the numerous water sprouts that will grow on the heavily pruned tree. Avoid pruning shears. Pull the shoots off the trunk in mid-June when they are about 10 to 12 inches long. Keep pulling these shoots off throughout the season on the major scaffolds. The shoots can be pulled off safely as long as their bases remain tender and green. Stop when the base of the shoot becomes woody and does not easily pull off.

Why do plums fall off tree

By ralph martyn

Why do plums fall off tree thay are small and green.And how much water do put on the tree.
thanks ralph.

Fruit drop can happen for

By Almanac Staff

Fruit drop can happen for many reasons: 1) Do you see any sign of insects? Plum curculio is a snout beetle that causes problems and you need to use a fruit tree spray at petal drop and up to 6 weeks after. 2) How is your soil? Plum trees do not do well in wet or compact soil; well-drained sandy loam is best. 3) Do you have plenty of sunshine? 4) Do you have pollinators? Unpollinated flowers will bear fruit, but they abort. 4) Are you thinning your fruit? 5) Are you watering enough? The amount of water needed depends on the size and age of the tree and weather conditions, but a first-year tree uses 5 to 10 gallons of water per week in the summer. The soil on the surface may be dry, but the soil at the root zone needs to be moist 4 to 6 inches down. Occasionally, you can dig down and see if it's moist (but not water logged).

I live in Wyoming (Zone

By J.

I live in Wyoming (Zone 4a)and want to plant a plum tree from a pit. Should I start it in my home then transplant outside in the spring? Would Satsuma and Santa Rosa do well here with the harsh winters? Any suggestions for better plum trees or other fruit trees at this elevation?

You don't grow plums from the

By Almanac Staff

You don't grow plums from the pits but you DO grow them from the seed. You probably want to start in the summer and pick fruit that is local to your area. Have fun tasting! Use seed from fully ripe fruit; avoid seeds from early maturing varieties. Let the pits dry for a few days and crack them open with a vise or hammer to harvest the seeds. You store them in the refrigerator in a closed container. A few months before your last frost, you'll want to start the sprouting process. Soak the seeds in room temperature water and put them into a jar of slightly moist potting soil. Close the jar and put them in the back corner of your fridge again. About a month before your last frost date, you can put the seedlings in the ground or in a pot.

I just learned of the purple

By Darlene Hutt

I just learned of the purple plum's life cycle of 20 years. Ours produces fruit...and we occassionally have what I thought a sucker that has the purple leaves, I am assuming the tree we have is grafted. We planted it when our son was born. It is an ornamental tree. But we've had ones say...it's producing fruit because it takes after the tree it was grafted onto.

So back to the suckers with the purple leaves...are they suckers or could one of the plums seeds grew a seedling? Because I am curious if we protected the sucker/seedling if we could plant it when the one we originally planted died. It would at least be part of the original tree hypothetically...

If it's grafted (which is

By Almanac Staff

If it's grafted (which is probably the case), the sucker isn't going to grow into the same plum tree. If you want your single plum tree to thrive, clear the suckers so all the energy is put into the tree or it will suffer.

I live in Canada, I have a

By Ling Yee

I live in Canada, I have a plum tree for many years. it is a self pollination one. We did not do any trimming at all. We have many holes in the leaves. It did bear fruits but the fruits never sweeten, why?

If the holes in the leaves

By Almanac Staff

If the holes in the leaves have a “shot hole” appearance, your plum tree my have a bacterial wilt. Early and late dormant copper sprays will aid in control. Optimum nutrition is also important. We suggest you consult with your local tree nursery for a spray program. You may want to bring in a leaf sample.

I have a plum tree that is 7

By Bill Peck

I have a plum tree that is 7 months old and i live in the south east portion of tn what should I do to ensure it makes it through the winter it is currently in a pot

Hi, Bill, The Tennessee mild

By Almanac Staff

Hi, Bill, The Tennessee mild winter climate means that you may leave most hardy plum varieties outdoors over winter. We would, however, make sure the plant is sheltered from any wind. Keep it well watered.
      If you weren't in a mild-winter zone, we would recommend that you move your fruit trees indoors in winter, perhaps in an unheated garage.
If you aren't sure how hardy your tree is, we would advise that you call your Tennessee cooperative extension: https://utextension.tennessee.edu/pages/offices.aspx

Cherry plum tree - I have

By Thava Sivapragasam

Cherry plum tree - I have this tree with many braches covered with large black funcus. The black funcas grow around the branch and then spread to other areas of the tree as well. I really dont want to kill the tree as some people said. Any suggestion?

Your tree had a fungus called

By Almanac Staff

Your tree had a fungus called Black Knot.  You need to prune out any infected areas, preferably before bud break.
Prune 2 to 4 inches below each knot. If pruning is not possible because knots are present on major scaffold limbs or the trunk, they can be removed by cutting away the diseased tissue down to healthy wood and out at least 1/2 inch beyond the edge of the knot. Burn or bury the prunings in early spring.
Fungicides are necessary and will provide the greatest benefit if applied before rainy periods, particularly when temperatures are greater than 55 degrees F. You need to maintain pruning, too.

I have an old plum tree

By PSA

I have an old plum tree (don't know how old it is), but it produces tons of wonderful fruit. This year however, it broke off about to half the size from the weight of the fruit, plus the fruit is not fully ripe. Will the fruit rippen if I pick it? How can I get the fruit to rippen? The broken branch is now starting to die. The tree was there when we bought the property so I don't even know what kind of plum they are.

If your plums have their

By Almanac Staff

If your plums have their first flush of color, they should ripen off the tree. Pick them and put them on a flat tray in a cool room for a few days and they should ripen up. In the future, if you want to keep this tree, you need to prune it and also thin the fruit when young so it's less loaded down. For plum trees, you want to thin in April/May when the fruit is about 1 diameter and about 2 to 4 inches apart.

I live in northern Washington

By scot t

I live in northern Washington State. elevation 2000 feet are winters can see temperatures 30* below zero . Are Stanley's a good variety to plant?

Stanley prune plums are

By Almanac Staff

Stanley prune plums are compatible with zones 5 to 7. Here is a zone map: http://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-washington-usda-plant-zone-hardiness-map.php

I live zone 7, southern

By GrammySan65

I live zone 7, southern Oregon. We have a purple flowering plum tree (cherry plums) that are dark red/purple. I am not sure WHEN to pick. Some have fallen to the ground with the wind and our tree is just loaded! Should I wait another week at least or go ahead and pick away? I will be making jam mostly, but eating lots too!! Thank you! I've tried to find info on when exactly to pick, but I'm seeing some say July and others say August. Thank you. I appreciate any suggestions!

Cherry plums are

By Almanac Staff

Cherry plums are traditionally not thinned. In terms of harvesting, they have a long range for ripening, so you really just need to look at the fruit. It's best to wait until they are fully mature, but before they fall from the tree. The best way is to take a couple samples and taste test! The fruit will become softer and the flesh will become juicier and sweeter. Often, it's the birds who will know and pick you clean! Netting is usually the best way to deter birds.

I have a plum tree about 7

By Ajit

I have a plum tree about 7 years old but hardly has any fruits. Last time it had any fruit about a dozen is 2 years ago. What is wrong with it.

Why doesn't the plum tree

By Ajit

Why doesn't the plum tree bear any fruits?

A plum tree normally starts

By Almanac Staff

A plum tree normally starts bearing fruit after 4 to 6 years. Do you have two or more varieties together? This is needed for pollination--the usual reason for lack of fruiting.

I have a plum tree that this

By Billy Hancock

I have a plum tree that this year was covered in with flowers... and not a single plum has come of it. Last year had flowers and 1... yes 1 plum, a little green plum. I am trying to make a decision whether I should (A) keep this as ornamental. (B) plant another to cross pollinate, or (3)Remove and replace with a locally purchased known good plum. the tree bloomed in May I need your advice

I have a large Stanley plum

By alex p

I have a large Stanley plum that was blown over last year and is leaning at about 30 degrees I tried to straighten it with ropes but don't have the room to get far enough for proper leverage and it a large tree.I keep cutting shoots that are coming from the stem. The tree is healthy and it is full of fruit.(best year ever) but leaning even more with the fruit and is blocking a used garden path.What cannot be done to straighten it out?
Thank you...Alex

Hi, Alex, If at least 1/2 of

By Almanac Staff

Hi, Alex, If at least 1/2 of the roots are in the soil, the tree may correct itself. Even if it's leaning, it may adjust. Normally, we'd use a power lift to pull it upright, making sure some soil was removed to place it below the existing soil grade level. Then, we'd attach 2 or 3 guy lines to the trunk at a point approximately two-thirds of the height of the tree. Anchor about 15 feet from the base of the tree to hold the tree in place.

I hope you can help. I'm

By berickson49

I hope you can help. I'm looking for a plum tree that has very dark meat. My grandmother had 1 in her yard in So. California and it made very good jam. I now live in zone 5 and would like to know what name I am looking for and if it will grow here. I have asked on several web sites and never get a replay. Please help me. Thanks, Barb

That sounds like the plum

By cyndib

That sounds like the plum tree we had in our yard in So Cal. It was a Satsuma plum. Reddish green on the outside and dark red to purple on the inside. I know it needs a pollinator. We had a Santa Rosa plum with it. The Satsuma was a meaty plum and the skin was not bitter.The Santa Rosa was very juicy and sweet, but the skin was tart. Hope this helps.

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I have a plum tree that was

By Kim Poteet-Schwartz

I have a plum tree that was frozen & uprooted during an ice storm. It fell over twice. This spring I completely re-planted it in another part of the yard. It still looks "stunned", & has completely re-covered. I'm not sure it I should be fertilizing it more, or what? Suggestions? It's now in the 90's now.
Kim Schwartz, Little Rock, AR

For a plum tree to recover,

By Almanac Staff

For a plum tree to recover, it needs almost all of its root system. It must be replanted when dormant in a mixture of soil and compost and also planted at a depth that is the same as its original site.
You might wish to stake the tree since it's bound to have lost some of its anchoring roots. Use padded ties ands takes at a low height.
Most plum trees do not need fertilization. Put organic mulch (pine needles) around the base after transplanting to keep weeds and grass away. Give it a gentle soaking daily for a couple of weeks to keep it watered and help the soil settle. Spray with dormant oil early next spring before leaf-out. It may take a few years to stabilize.

Storing Plums at 31 degrees F?

By Anonymous

I am confused about the advice to store plums at 31 degrees F. Yes, that would definitely preserve them over an extended period of time because they would be FROZEN! This information could not possibly be correct! I don't know about you, but I don't want frozen plums. I want 'fresh' plums! What really IS the best temperature to preserve fresh plums?

I just wanted to add that I

By MrPisky

I just wanted to add that I believe there is a respiration factor at work here too. I know that blueberries will continue to produce heat during respiration after the fruit is picked from the bush. Harvested plums are likely doing the same thing. Chilling slows down the respiration process and greatly extends shelf life.

Not Frozen

By Anonymous

It is important to remember that 32 degrees is the freezing temperature for water. As soon as you add sugar and pectin to the water the freezing temperature lowers to 26 degrees or less. So plums will do great at 31 degrees.

We checked with several state

By Almanac Staff

We checked with several state extension services and a plum advisory board to confirm that yes indeed, 31 to 32 degrees is the optimum temperature for storing fresh plums. Relative humidity of 90%-95% is also advised.

Planting Plum seeds

By Anonymous

If planting the plum seed in a pot before putting in in the grow, would caring for the plant change any

planting from seed

By Anonymous

I just dried out a plum seed and would like to know when is the best time to plant the seed, I live in central iowa and not sure when is the best time to plant the seed

Plant the plum pit mid-fall

By Almanac Staff

Plant the plum pit mid-fall about 4 inches deep. The pit needs to go through the winter in order to germinate. Water well before the weather turns cold. Most fruit trees grow best in a sunny location.

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