March Birth Flowers

Birth Flower for March

Daffodils near stream
National Trust

March’s birth flower is the daffodil. It’s no surprise. These cheerful flowers are harbinger of spring! Learn more about daffodil’s flower meaning and symbolism.

narcissus-fairy_half_width.jpgMarch Birth Flower

Daffodil is actually just a nickname. The botanical or Latin name is “Narcissus” which comes from the Greek word “narkissos” and its base word “narke,” meaning a narcotic or numb sensation, attributed to the sedative effect from the alkaloids in its plants. All members are poisonous, which is great for gardeners, because that makes them critter-proof. The bulbs and leaves contain poisonous crystals which only certain insects can eat with impunity. They may, however, dig up the bulbs.

March’s flower is sometimes called the jonquil. However, note that this term is sometimes misused; jonquil is one group of daffodils, not all daffodils. The Royal Horticultural Society divides Narcissus into 13 divisions from the large showy cup to trumpets to jonquils (division 7) to wild variants.

Daffodil Flower Meaning

The daffodil symbolizes unequaled love, so giving this flower to someone expresses a deep love that can not be rivaled or imitated.

The daffodil has also been associated in history with death and rebirth—from the death of the self-loving Narcissus in Greek mythology to its perennial return as an Easter flower.  

daffodil-march_birth_flower-1920x1534px-pixabay_0_full_width.jpg

Certainly, one of the first flowers of spring brings us new beginnings and, as the poet Keats said, daffodils bring “joy for ever”. With their bright yellow petals, daffodils seem the perfect way to say that the sun is always shining whenever your loved one is around.

Source: 

The Old Farmer's Almanac

Leave a Comment

You must have Javascript enabled to use this form.