Full Moon in November 2021

Look for November's Full Beaver Moon!

October 4, 2021
Full Beaver Moon - OFA

November’s full Beaver Moon rises on Friday, November 19, 2021! Learn when to spot it in your area and the meaning behind this Moon’s name.

When to See November’s Full Moon

The Beaver Moon reaches peak illumination in the early morning hours of Friday, November 19, at 3:59 A.M. EST. Of course, it will be very close to full the night before, so plan to look for it starting on Thursday, November 18, just after sunset!

→ Find out exactly what time the full Moon will appear above the horizon in your area with our Moonrise and Moonset Calculator.

Why Is It Called the Beaver Moon?

For decades, the Almanac has referenced the monthly full Moons with names tied to early Native American, Colonial American, and European folklore. Traditionally, each full Moon name was applied to the entire lunar month in which it occurred and through all of the Moon’s phases—not only the full Moon.

The Beaver Moon

Why the “Beaver” Moon? This is the time of year when beavers begin to take shelter in their lodges, having laid up sufficient stores of food for the long winter ahead. During the time of the fur trade in North America, it was also the season to trap beavers for their thick, winter-ready pelts. 

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Alternative November Moon Names

November’s Moon names highlight the actions of animals preparing for winter and the onset of the colder days ahead. Digging (or Scratching) Moon, a Tlingit name, evokes the image of animals foraging for fallen nuts and shoots of green foliage, and of bears digging their winter dens. The Dakota and Lakota term Deer Rutting Moon refers to the time when deer are seeking out mates and the Algonquin Whitefish Moon describes the spawning time for this fish.

In reference to the seasonal change of November, this Moon has been called the Frost Moon by the Cree and Assiniboine peoples and the Freezing Moon by the Anishinaabe—for good reason, as winter is right around the corner!

→ See more Full Moon names and their meanings.

Image: Moonrise over the Syr Darya river, Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls 
Image: Moonrise over the Syr Darya river, Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls 

Moon Phases for November 2021

Below are the times for each of the Moon’s phases this month (in Eastern Time). Click here to see the Moon Phase dates and times for your location.

Moon Phases for November 2021

New Moon: November 4, 5:15 P.M. EDT
First Quarter: November 11, 7:48 A.M. EST
Full Moon: November 19, 3:59 A.M. EST
Last Quarter: November 27, 7:29 A.M. EST

→ When is the next full Moon? Consult our Full Moon Dates chart.

Full Beaver Moon Video

An Almanac editor shares more facts and folklore about November’s Full Beaver Moon. Click below to watch the video.

Best Days in November 2021

Below are the best days for certain activities, based on the Moon’s sign and phase in November.

For Harvesting:

  • Aboveground crops: 17, 18
  • Belowground crops: 27, 28

For Setting Eggs: 

  • 18–20

For Fishing:

  • 4–19

See Best Days for more activities.

Moon Facts

  • Did you know: The spin-time of the Moon on its own axis is identical to the time it takes the Moon to revolve around Earth, which is why the Moon always keeps almost exactly the same face toward us.
  • How much would you weigh on the Moon? Just multiply your weight (it doesn’t matter if it’s in pounds or kilograms) by 0.165. You’d weigh about 80 percent less!

Learn more about Full Moon Names and share your thoughts about this month’s Moon below! 

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Reader Comments

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Full Moon Explainations not in the printed almanac anymore?

I always find this information helpful, interesting and intriguing ….but why is it no longer printed in the Farmers Almanac? I'm pretty sure it used to be, but I just went digging through two years worth and could not find this information....am I missing it? Or is it a "digital bonus" only? Thanks!

Full Moons in print

The Editors's picture

Thanks for asking, Cyndee. We produce two versions of the paperback Almanac, one for $7.99 and one for $8.95. The version at the slightly higher price has 32 pages of Reference material at the back (like the Calendar and Weather Forecast pages, the Reference pages each have a black tab on them that you can see as a black “line” when you look sideways at the issue). The $8.95 version is sold at bookstores, the $7.99 on newsstands, checkouts, our own magazine stands, and the like. We have different price points to serve different readerships and channels of distribution.

BTW, the extra Reference section is also bound into the the $9.99 “large print” version and the hardcover version ($15.95). We say “large print” because the pages are slightly larger and the paper is better quality (whiter) so the ink is easier to read. This is not “large print” as it is found, say, in a library book.

I hope this does not add confusion but helps to clarify. You can purchase any version of the Almanac at Almanac.com/store and the “large print” version on Amazon.com.

Full moons on Thanksgiving past 50years

Does anyone know how many Thanksgivings in the past 50 years had a Full Moon??

Thanksgiving Full Moons

Catherine Boeckmann's picture

Interesting question! There’s an Almanac Moon phase calendar that goes back to 1970 of that helps! www.almanac.com/astronomy/moon/calendar

Moon's rotation

This is a theory I have about the moon....
I have always been interested in the fact that the same side of the moon always faces us. The reason for this is unknown at this time (or at least unproven). It could be coincidental that the moon rotates perfectly, so that we only see the same side all of the time. I don't think that is very likely. I have questioned this observation before and the explanation provided at the time was that it was due to tidal pull. That's possible, but I personally think it could be due to the fact that the moon's gravity is uneven. Satellites have documented that the gravitational pull on the moon is uneven which could result in what we are seeing now. And that being so, it would be like a beach ball with a weight taped to one side of it having the heavier side roll on a hard surface so that the heaviest side would be facing downward. This could be the reason that the part of the moon's surface that has a higher mass always faces towards the earth. I came up with this idea many years ago and it could be a valid answer to the problem. What do others think? Are there other moons or planets that rotate showing the same side like our moon? I'm not aware of any, but it might help solve the question if there were.

Full Beaver Moon;

Interesting theory; I thought the size of the moon is the same as the earth when seen from a distance; seems pretty incredible to me; thanks!!!;

Full Beaver Moon;

Beavers are a very important component of the Earth's Ecology; Beavers clear the woods by using branches to build dams; those dams create small ponds intermittently dotted in woods;
With the decline of Beavers; we have more dry wood; and fewer ponds; resulting in "wildfires";
The Beavers themselves are mother natures unseen "Fire Prevention brigade. "Beavers rule"

Star light, Star Bright.

Hey first time here so here goes. For the last month, (Nov), I've seen a very bright light in the east, south east sky early in the morning. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks!

bright star

The Editors's picture

Welcome! That bright light may be Venus, which has been a “morning star” (a term describing bright planets that become visible in the east before sunrise) for a few months. You might be interested in this article that talked a bit about it from mid-October:

https://www.almanac.com/blog/astronomy/astronomy/smiling-moon-venus-mars-october-17

If you have a 2017 Almanac with you, you can also find a bit more about Venus as a morning star on page 124.

Its very odd for me to ask if

Its very odd for me to ask if it is a full moon however i just felt it. I know that may seem weird but i feel there is more too the moon than what meets the eye. So many things happen on full moons that goes unexplained. What is it NASA will not say? Somehow we are connected to the moons force.

FULL MOON EFFECT ON LIFE

The effect of the moon on tides is the same reason for its effect on people, because the human body is MOSTLY water.
Personally, I feel that when I am in tune with the Universe I feel good/well when the moon is full. If I'm out of balance physically or mentally, that's when I'm a 'LUNATIC'!
In Love Always Shellie in Sunrise

What does it mean when you

What does it mean when you can still see the moon during daylight hours? Sometimes, even though it is broad daylight I can see the moon. What are the circumstances that make that possible?

Good question. Though we can

The Editors's picture

Good question. Though we can’t always see it, the Moon is up in the daytime as often as at night. It’s easiest to see right after the Full Moon in the morning. Or, look before a Full Moon in the afternoon.  You’re also more likely to see it within a week or so of the Full Moon.

Why does the moon look red

Why does the moon look red tonight 11\12\2016 I'm in Dunlap Tennessee??

When the Moon looks red (or

The Editors's picture

When the Moon looks red (or orange), this is due to the particles in the Earth’s atmosphere.  Often, the Moon is more reddish when it is close to the horizon; this is because the moonlight must travel through more of our atmosphere to get to your eyes when the Sun or Moon is on the horizon. The Moon will also look more red or orange when it is rising or setting because that’s also a time when the light has to travel through the most atmosphere to get to you. If you see an especially beautiful red or pink sunset, there are probably additional clouds enhancing the effect.

What does it mean when your

What does it mean when your birthday falls on a Super moon. Not the moon phase at the time of your birth, but when your birthday (this year, Nov. 14, 2016) lands on a Super moon?

Full moon

I find that the full moon the stars and space is also interesting. Tonight I took some pictures of the full moon I'll try to send one

names of full moonsC

Very neat to get to now the old ways of the moon

picture of moon on video

This picture is exactly like one that I took last year. Locating it & sending it to you.

it is common knowledge that

it is common knowledge that most births happen in or araound the change of the moon (Full moon or New Moon). Is there a reason why?

Many people believe that

The Editors's picture

Many people believe that there is a correlation between the full and/or new Moon phases and an increase in the number of births. Others think that this is a myth. Several scientific studies have not been able to prove the correlation. That said, we always welcome all perspectives and your thoughts on the matter.

Ask any Nurse or Doctor that

Ask any Nurse or Doctor that works in Labor and Delivery they will tell you, yes more babies are born during the new and full moons. :)

Full Moon births

The reason for full moon births is because 9 months earlier they were conceived. :)

quick question OFA - when we

quick question OFA - when we see half of the moon - we call it a quarter moon - I guess because we are seeing 25% of the whole thing. Following that logic - should a 'full' moon be a half moon - as we only see 50% of the whole? Please solve the debate with my son - as the descriptions appear inconsistent...

Great question! According to

The Editors's picture

Great question! According to the United States Naval Observatory, the First Quarter and Last Quarter Moon phases are named as such because of their position in the Moon's orbit. The First Quarter is 1/4 of the way through its orbit from starting position (New Moon), and the Third Quarter is 3/4 of the way along in its orbit.
http://aa.usno.navy.mil/faq/do...
The Full Moon is named instead for the percent of surface illuminated from our viewpoint (100 percent, full disc), and occurs when the Moon is 1/2 the way along in its orbit.
New Moon--named so because in this case it is the start of the lunar cycle; we can see no surface illumination from our position on Earth.

why is that i always get my

why is that i always get my period two days before the full moon

look up the jonas method or

look up the jonas method or the moon's placement on the dte of your birthday.

Because you are very healthy.

Because you are very healthy. That is a good sign you are synched up with nature and your body. Always minimize any artificial lights at night, esp when sleeping and recognize you may be very naturally fertile..so take precautions to protect your lifestyle.

Is it possible to predict

Is it possible to predict when the moon is due south based (for inland areas) on the times for high tides correspondingly; since high and low tides for best fishing times are set by coastal times of high and low times only?

I'm not sure I understand

The Editors's picture

I'm not sure I understand your question, but if you are looking for how to find out when the Moon is due south, I believe that you need to find the Moon's azimuth when it is 180 degrees East of North. The following calculator will help you with that:
http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/d...
Just select "Moon" and put in your location, and it will give you the azimuth in intervals that you've selected for one day.  For example, for Boston, Massachusetts, on November 14, the Moon's azimuth at 5:34 am EST is 180.1 degrees East of North, which means it is about due South for that location.
As to the relationship between the tides and when the Moon is due South, it is a general guideline that when the Moon is due South, there will be the time of high tide in coastal locations. Keep in mind that different coastal locations, due to the layout of the coast etc, may experience 1 or 2 high tides, and if 2, some places will have 1 very high tide and 1 not-as-high tide, while others have about equal high tides. So, the "high tide occurs when the Moon is due South" is a very general guideline. The Moon's position plays a large role, but so does Earth's topography etc.
Hope this helps!
 

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