How to Garden on a Budget

Cheap Gardening Ideas

January 11, 2019

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In this short video, we show you how to plan a beautiful and productive vegetable garden that won’t break your budget. We hope you are inspired by these ideas! 

The cost of buying seeds and plants can quickly add up. Track down local seed and plant swaps to fill up your garden very cheaply—or, even for free! Choice of varieties will be limited so you may need to be flexible, and remember you’ll need to have something to swap in return.

When buying seeds, look out for special offers on seed supplier websites just before the start of the growing season, and near the end of it. Most seeds will remain fresh for several seasons but some, such as parsnip and corn, will need replacing every year or two.

You can save your own seeds from open-pollinated (heirloom) varieties of vegetables to save even more money. Tomatoes, beans and lettuces are very easy to save seeds from.

Free Fertilizer

You can make your own compost for free too. Pile up spent vegetables and kitchen scraps in a sheltered but sunny out-of-the-way corner of the garden. To keep the heap tidy you can create a compost bin using recycled materials such as old pallets.

Gather up leaves in fall up to make your own leaf mold, which is a fantastic free soil amendment. Friends and neighbors are often only too happy to let your have their fallen leaves too!

Farms and stables can be good sources of free manure. Make sure it’s well rotted down or composted before using, and that the animals haven’t been feeding on pasture that’s been treated with herbicides which could harm your plants.

Plant Supports  

Bamboo canes are free if you grow your own! Any strong, straight stems from other trees and shrubs such as hazel and buddleia make great poles for beans and other climbers.

Crop Protection  

Use old clear plastic bottles, polythene stretched over homemade hoops, or recycled glass doors and windows to protect plants from the cold.

Improvise shade cloth using double layers of old tulle. Shade newly sown beds of cool-season crops like lettuce with cardboard until the seedlings sprout. And protect transplants with upturned pots for a day or two until they settle in. 

You can also shield seedlings from cold, drying winds using collars made from cut-down plastic bottles.

Natural Pest Control  

Grow nectar-rich flowers such as cosmos and alyssum, or flowering herbs like dill and parsley, to attract pest predators including hoverflies, lacewings and ladybugs. You can also leave some carrots and onions in the ground to flower the next season.

Recycled Containers 

Almost anything that holds potting soil can be used as a growing container, as long as you punch holes into the bottom for proper drainage.

Grow seedlings in old yogurt pots, soft fruit trays and mushroom trays. Or, make your own from newspaper or toilet tissue tubes, which are great for deeper-rooting seedlings such as corn or beans.

Boundaries and Paths 

Make simple paths cheaply by covering the ground with a layer of thick cardboard then covering it with bark chippings. The chippings will need to be replenished occasionally.

Or use salvaged slabs, bricks or cobbles, and infill with cheaper materials such as gravel.

Hedging plants are available bare-rooted in winter much more cheaply than potted plants. Make it productive by planting trained fruit trees or fruiting hedgerow species.

Also, consider which crops provide the highest value for you and your family. See more about saving money in the garden!

Ready to Plan a Garden?

Now, get a free 7-day trial of The Old Farmer’s Almanac online Garden Planner!

It’s ample time to play around on the computer—and plan your first garden!

Try out the Garden Planner now for free.

 

 

2019 Garden Guide

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