Vegetable Garden Planner

How to Grow Vegetables

Different vegetables require different conditions to thrive. Plan your garden accordingly with our guidelines below for growing vegetables.

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Growing Vegetables Guide

Note: Each of the vegetables listed below links to a free planting and growing guide!

Vegetable Start Seeds Indoors (weeks before last spring frost) Start Seeds Outdoors (weeks before or after last spring frost) Minimum Soil Temp. to Germinate (°F) Cold Hardiness When to Fertilize When to Water
Beans Anytime after 48–50 Tender After heavy bloom and set of pods Regularly, from start of pod to set
Beets 3 before to 3 after 39–41 Half-hardy At time of planting Only during drought conditions
Broccoli 6–8 2–3 before 55–75 Hardy Three weeks after transplanting Only during drought conditions
Brussels sprouts 6–8 55–75 Hardy Three weeks after transplanting At transplanting
Cabbage 6–8 1 before to 1 after 38–40 Hardy Three weeks after transplanting Two to three weeks before harvest
Carrots 3–5 before 39–41 Half-hardy Preferably in the fall for the following spring Only during drought conditions
Cauliflower 6–8 1 before to 1after 65–75 Half-hardy Three weeks after transplanting Once, three weeks before harvest
Celery 6–8 60–70 Tender At time of transplanting Once a week
Corn 2 after 46–50 Tender When eight to ten inches tall, and again when first silk appears When tassels appear and cobs start to swell
Cucumbers 2–4 1–2 after 65–70 Very tender One week after bloom, and again three weeks later Frequently, especially when fruits form
Lettuce 4–6 1 before to 2 after 40–75 Half-hardy Two to three weeks after transplanting Once a week
Melons 2–4 2 after 55–60 Very tender One week after bloom, and again three weeks later Once a week
Onion sets 4 before 34–36 Hardy When bulbs begin to swell, and again when plants are one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Parsnips 0–3 before 55–70 Hardy One year before planting Only during drought conditions
Peas 4–6 before 34–36 Hardy After heavy bloom and set of pods Regularly, from start of pod to set
Peppers 8–10 70–80 Very tender After first fruit-set Once a week
Potato tubers 0–2 after 55–70 Half-hardy At bloom time or time of second hilling Regularly, when tubers start to form
Pumpkins 2–4 1 after 55–60 Tender Just before vines start to run, when plants are about one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Radishes 1 before to 1 after 39–41 Hardy Before spring planting Once a week
Spinach 4–6 before 55–65 Hardy When plants are one-third grown Once a week
Squash, summer 2–4 1 after 55–60 Very tender Just before vines start to run, when plants are about one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Squash, winter 2–4 1 after 55–60 Tender Just before vines start to run, when plants are about one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Tomatoes 6–8 50–55 Tender Two weeks before, and after first picking Twice a week

 

Comments

what month do I start getting

By hawk guebara

what month do I start getting the ground ready for winter garden? " I am the registered user."

Before the ground gets too

By Almanac Staff on September 2

Before the ground gets too hard, you'll want to remove any old plant debris and weeds to avoid overwintering insects. See our article on putting the garden to bed here: http://www.almanac.com/content/putting-garden-bed

I want to plant cabbage and

By tinyiko

I want to plant cabbage and tomatoes

We moved our garden to a new

By NadineN

We moved our garden to a new spot for more room, our new garden plot has a slight incline & the top seems to stay drier. I thought we could plant according to the grade. Vegetables that are dry tolerant to the higher/drier end etc. Just wondering if someone could help me with that layout? Is there a rule of thumb to that planting layout? Ready to garden if it would quit snowing!

Some herbs such as rosemary

By Almanac Staff

Some herbs such as rosemary or thyme will do well in a dry spot, and root crops such as carrots and beetroot will often cope with drier soil (for short periods, at least). If the soil is very dry, however, you may find installing irrigation easier to enable you to rotate annual crops in that part of your garden.

 

I too have that problem. My

By David Hudson

I too have that problem. My garden is 120'x250' with a slight incline. I box bladed the low area to give me a water run off. Also, if you build your rows up with a row hipper, or disc row builder, any rain will run off between your rows. This will help keep your plants dry during heavy rain.

I planted three tomato plants

By sandy carson

I planted three tomato plants last year 2013. I just let them run on the ground. They didn't do very good until Aug/Sept then we had so many tomato's that in Nov I pick all the green tomato's and pulled up my plants that were 5 and 6 feet long. I plan on doing the same this year.

Hello, Can anyone advise me

By Namrata

Hello, Can anyone advise me on the specific weather/climatic conditions required to grow Rocket Leaves/Arugula? I live in India and it is not very commonly available in the state I live. Would really appreciate the help. Thanks

we let our broccoli plants

By broccoli lovers

we let our broccoli plants flower out and are now seeing green seed pods.we have never started our broccoli from seed we just get plants at the nursery in the spring when we plant our garden. we would love to save and just start them ourselves. When do we pick them for use next season? and how?

You can save broccoli seeds

By Almanac Staff

You can save broccoli seeds though the seed takes a long time to mature. Let the pods dry and go brown. This can take a couple of months.
Once brown, crack them open and you'll see dark brown dots. Those are the seeds. Store in a cool, dry place until planting time. You can tie a paper bag over the pods so that the day that the dry pods shatter, you don't lose he seeds. Also, keep in mind that broccoli will cross with all members of Brassica oleracea so you want some distance between the plants for pure seed!

Last year my tomatoes were

By cindig

Last year my tomatoes were great for the first third of the harvest. Then they started to have holes in them. Not tiny holes but holes big enough to see easily. Some even finger size. Since I did not know what was making the holes or why I threw them away. It happened to every tomato that I grew unless I picked then when they were so green that they were not very good. This was my first garden so unsure of what happened. Also my peppers never grew at all. Any thoughts?

I think you might have horn

By Todd H. Eachus

I think you might have horn worms on your tomatoes plants. You have be able to see these worm. they are large and green in color. Just pick them off and squish them.

From the information that you

By James R Allen

From the information that you provided you may have "stink bugs" also known as "shield bugs". They break the skin of a tomato while it is green by sticking a tube from it's mouth into it. They will secrete a fluid from their organs into the tomato turning the flesh into a liquid that they will feed on. Try "Neem Oil" to spray on the plants and tomatoes. Neem Oil is organic and non-toxic to humans and pets.

We have all probably had this

By Almanac Staff

We have all probably had this happen: something is eating your tomatoes. Tomato horn worms can devastate a crop. Tomato fruit worms can (also) bring you to tears. (These go by several names: tobacco bud, corn ear-, and cotton boll worm.) And those are just a couple possible pests.
Treatments get mixed reviews; some sources recommend insecticides with BT.
Peppers may be a different story, or not. This additional outcome--on plants that are generally considered companions to tomatoes--makes us think that you should check your soil's pH and quality/amount of compost.
Then again, the problem might have originated with the plants. The tomatoes could have carried worm eggs. The peppers may have been weak. Or planted too soon in season.
There are lots of factors that might contribute. Gardening is somewhat of an experiment. Keep at it.

We're planning our first

By merimags

We're planning our first veggie garden in over thirty years! I'm at a loss to know the number of plants or rows to provide for seasonal eating as well as canning and freezing for a family of six adults. We have limited space so figuring the size of the garden will be important. In consideration for the garden: tomatoes,green beans,sweet peas,summer squash,bell and hot peppers,pickling cukes,okra,sweet corn,leaf lettuce and radishes.Can you suggest a scource for this information?

Hi, Merimags, This free

By Catherine Boeckmann

Hi, Merimags,
This free Almanac Garden Planner might be really useful for you:
http://gardenplanner.almanac.com/
Also, did you check out the main Gardening Page? Right at the top, there's a beginner's gardening plot plan that might be helpful.

I have long white radishes

By Jerry L Barnett

I have long white radishes that are putting on flowers. Do I pinch them off so the fruit grows bigger.

If your radishes have

By Almanac Staff

If your radishes have flowers, they may need to be pulled out. The usual cause is cold temperatures that move them into their reproductive cycle.

I have a problem with my

By Patricia Anderson

I have a problem with my roses. Some of the branches look deformed. On more than 1 bush. But not all brances have done this.Anyone know what the cause is? Thanks.

It’s important to remove the

By Almanac Staff

It’s important to remove the deformed branches. Here are some pruning guidelines for healthy rose plants.
Remove all dead wood and wood that is diseased, broken or injured. Also remove any basal shoots and branches that cross through the center of the plant or rub on other branches.
Prune to provide good air movement through the plant. Make the cuts above a strong bud that faces the outside of the plant using sharp pruning shears or knives.
See our Roses page for plant care: http://www.almanac.com/plant/roses

I have been searching for the

By gorimati

I have been searching for the instructions for planting some vegetables that I could be harvest on my garden and I have got it. This Growing Vegetables table or sheet has included useful elements very wisely because here I have found various kinds of vegetables, its suite conditions & and useful information to harvest it with systemically. Actually I loved Cauliflower and I'm too much interested to plant it on my garden, also Celery and Tomatoes too. Last time I had try to plant Cauliflower, but it didn't harvest properly and all my Cauliflower became brown and wasted. All my hard works are had been become worse. Even now, I would be fertilizing Cauliflower properly with the help of this information.

My brussels sprouts are

By jimlackner

My brussels sprouts are starting to develop and I plan fall harvest. Someone told me I should remove the leaves so that the sprouts get more nutrirnts. Is this true?

my tomatoes are wilting and i

By daggumyankie

my tomatoes are wilting and i dont know why,can you help me

Try watering every

By Militonia

Try watering every morning-early b-4 heat starts or in the early evening. In extreme heat I do both when possible.

I never water in the

By seedsower

I never water in the evenings, I've read it welcomes fungus.

Peidmont of NC

By seedsower

Peidmont of NC

I just planted my tomato

By dab134

I just planted my tomato plants outside on 5/30. They are staked, mulched, and have been watered at the roots 3 times. They looked great when I put them out, then wilted a bit the first day or so. Now they seem to have some new growth, but also have leaves that are light green with white splotches. What might be going on? Too much/too little water? Not hardened off enough? Please help, I'm a bit worried...

You said they were

By Militonia

You said they were mulched.What were they mulched with? If it is a heavy mulch such as bark or garden rock you will need to water for a longer period of time to get water into the roots of the plant.
The"splotches",you could try a spray mist or wash of 1 teaspoon dishsoap in a gallon of water and spray for bugs,slugs,cutworms-those green catipillars.

It sounds like your plants

By Almanac Staff

It sounds like your plants have a bacterial disease that is causing the wilting. Often times this is due to over watering, but the disease also could have started in the seed. Unfortunately, you may have lost your plants for the season. Consult your local Cooperative Extension to get their opinion, they are the experts in your Zone, and may know if other plants have been affected in your area. Next year, practice crop rotation, and do not plant in the same spot. Good Luck! http://www.almanac.com/content/cooperative-extension-services

Good suggestions.

By Phyggie

Good suggestions.

Last year I planted 6

By pinky

Last year I planted 6 tomatoes and the plants did great . they grew higher then my head. However, they had very few tomatoes on them and the ones they had were very small. I have raised a few tomatoes every year since I can remember and never has this happened before. Any help or clues as to what I did wrong will be most helpful this year??? Thank-you

Lime soil before planting and

By 1seatech

Lime soil before planting and add 1 tablespoon of epsom salts per plant location to add yield. It works great for me here in the Florida panhandle. Epsom salt is a plant nutrient. When the tomato blooms open, spray them with bloom set to allow more pollination time.

Sometimes "Leaf Curl" disease

By Phyggie

Sometimes "Leaf Curl" disease will stunt the growth of your tomatoes. It will invade eggplant, cucumbers, almost any fruit-bearing vine. It is a monster. Before planting may I suggest you "study" the plant, the threats (insects and pests) and decide what type of control you will use? It beats being so very disappointed. This has happened to me a few times.
Read: http://pep.wsu.edu/hortsense/scripts/query/displayProblem.asp?problemID=501&tableName=plant and also http://pep.wsu.edu/Home_Garden/H_G_Pesticide_Info/? about pesticides. Take a deep breath and prepare for next season. One good thing is that you planted them "well" since they grew so tall! Best wishes!

Hi Pinky, Try regulating the

By Almanac Staff

Hi Pinky, Try regulating the amount of fertilizer you use, or change the make-up. Too much nitrogen causes excessive foliage but little fruit. Also--it may just be the variety you are growing that produces small tomatoes. Talk with someone at your local nursery to get the variety you want. See our tomatoes page here for more tips and advice: http://www.almanac.com/plant/tomatoes

It says to water tomatoes

By Davetruth

It says to water tomatoes twice a week and I heard that they need 2 inches a week. If using a regular spraying hose how do you know when it is enough?

You should water your tomato

By Almanac Staff

You should water your tomato plants 2 to 3 times a week, giving them about a gallon's worth of water each time. You can save an empty milk gallon and fill that each time you need to water your tomatoes so you know you're giving them the right amount.

I am told if you sprinkle a

By 1oldbuzzard

I am told if you sprinkle a little sulphur at the base of the Tomatoes it will help the blight

My daughter (4 yrs.) and I

By Kevin Klug

My daughter (4 yrs.) and I sowed seeds a couple of weeks ago and obliously went overboard. We have hundreds of sprouts coming up in every foot of each row. When and to what extent do I thin these for, turnips, radishes, turnip greens, chard, carrots, spinach? Everything else we used starters so it is not a problem. Please help, everything looks happy and I do not want to overdo it or do it to soon. (Louisiana)

I never thin my turnips,

By David Hudson

I never thin my turnips, chard or spinach. let them grow and the healthy ones will overtake the weaker. If you decide to thin, use something to cut the seedlings and not pull them out as this may damage the roots of the ones you want to keep. The carrots need to be about 3" apart, spinach needs to be about 4" apart, Turnips 3", chard 4". I eat only the greens not the turnips.

Bell Pepper question: The

By LindaLou

Bell Pepper question:
The fall cold mornings are settiing in, 40F and below. I have a great crop of bell peppers, but they are not quite ready to pick... maybe another 10 days. Should I pick or leave them out there?

I have used compost in my

By Ken Bungard

I have used compost in my soil used water twice a week. My tomatoes are turning brown. I never scene nothimg like it before.

Could be sunscald or any

By Richard DaLizard

Could be sunscald or any number of bacterial or fungal blights. Try http://luv2garden.com/tomato_diseases.html

What kind of compost did you

By jvannatta

What kind of compost did you use and how much? Certain compost must be used sparingly and some must be used heavily. Depending on what you used it could have been to much.

They most likely have a

By beachrn

They most likely have a fungus. Buy some fungicide made for veggies and follow the directions. The same thing happen my tomatoes and as long as I sprayed once weekly it was kept under control. Hope this helps.

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