Vegetable Growing Guide

How to Grow Vegetables

January 7, 2018
Tomatoes
Photo by Pixabay

Different vegetables require different conditions to thrive. Plan your garden accordingly with our guidelines below for growing vegetables.

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Vegetables Growing Guide

Note: Each of the vegetables listed below links to a free planting and growing guide!

Vegetable Start Seeds Indoors (weeks before last spring frost) Start Seeds Outdoors (weeks before or after last spring frost) Minimum Soil Temp. to Germinate (°F) Cold Hardiness When to Fertilize When to Water
Beans Anytime after 48–50 Tender After heavy bloom and set of pods Regularly, from start of pod to set
Beets 3 before to 3 after 39–41 Half-hardy At time of planting Only during drought conditions
Broccoli 6–8 2–3 before 55–75 Hardy Three weeks after transplanting Only during drought conditions
Brussels sprouts 6–8 55–75 Hardy Three weeks after transplanting At transplanting
Cabbage 6–8 1 before to 1 after 38–40 Hardy Three weeks after transplanting Two to three weeks before harvest
Carrots 3–5 before 39–41 Half-hardy Preferably in the fall for the following spring Only during drought conditions
Cauliflower 6–8 1 before to 1after 65–75 Half-hardy Three weeks after transplanting Once, three weeks before harvest
Celery 6–8 60–70 Tender At time of transplanting Once a week
Corn 2 after 46–50 Tender When eight to ten inches tall, and again when first silk appears When tassels appear and cobs start to swell
Cucumbers 2–4 1–2 after 65–70 Very tender One week after bloom, and again three weeks later Frequently, especially when fruits form
Lettuce 4–6 1 before to 2 after 40–75 Half-hardy Two to three weeks after transplanting Once a week
Melons 2–4 2 after 55–60 Very tender One week after bloom, and again three weeks later Once a week
Onion sets 4 before 34–36 Hardy When bulbs begin to swell, and again when plants are one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Parsnips 0–3 before 55–70 Hardy One year before planting Only during drought conditions
Peas 4–6 before 34–36 Hardy After heavy bloom and set of pods Regularly, from start of pod to set
Peppers 8–10 70–80 Very tender After first fruit-set Once a week
Potato tubers 0–2 after 55–70 Half-hardy At bloom time or time of second hilling Regularly, when tubers start to form
Pumpkins 2–4 1 after 55–60 Tender Just before vines start to run, when plants are about one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Radishes 1 before to 1 after 39–41 Hardy Before spring planting Once a week
Spinach 4–6 before 55–65 Hardy When plants are one-third grown Once a week
Squash, summer 2–4 1 after 55–60 Very tender Just before vines start to run, when plants are about one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Squash, winter 2–4 1 after 55–60 Tender Just before vines start to run, when plants are about one foot tall Only during drought conditions
Tomatoes 6–8 50–55 Tender Two weeks before, and after first picking Twice a week

 

Reader Comments

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I am told if you sprinkle a

I am told if you sprinkle a little sulphur at the base of the Tomatoes it will help the blight

My daughter (4 yrs.) and I

My daughter (4 yrs.) and I sowed seeds a couple of weeks ago and obliously went overboard. We have hundreds of sprouts coming up in every foot of each row. When and to what extent do I thin these for, turnips, radishes, turnip greens, chard, carrots, spinach? Everything else we used starters so it is not a problem. Please help, everything looks happy and I do not want to overdo it or do it to soon. (Louisiana)

I never thin my turnips,

I never thin my turnips, chard or spinach. let them grow and the healthy ones will overtake the weaker. If you decide to thin, use something to cut the seedlings and not pull them out as this may damage the roots of the ones you want to keep. The carrots need to be about 3" apart, spinach needs to be about 4" apart, Turnips 3", chard 4". I eat only the greens not the turnips.

Bell Pepper question: The

Bell Pepper question:
The fall cold mornings are settiing in, 40F and below. I have a great crop of bell peppers, but they are not quite ready to pick... maybe another 10 days. Should I pick or leave them out there?

Could have a blight

Could have a blight

I have used compost in my

I have used compost in my soil used water twice a week. My tomatoes are turning brown. I never scene nothimg like it before.

They most likely have a

They most likely have a fungus. Buy some fungicide made for veggies and follow the directions. The same thing happen my tomatoes and as long as I sprayed once weekly it was kept under control. Hope this helps.

What kind of compost did you

What kind of compost did you use and how much? Certain compost must be used sparingly and some must be used heavily. Depending on what you used it could have been to much.

Could be sunscald or any

Could be sunscald or any number of bacterial or fungal blights. Try http://luv2garden.com/tomato_d...

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